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The impact of HIV-related neuropsychological dysfunction on driving behavior

  • THOMAS D. MARCOTTE (a1), ROBERT K. HEATON (a1), TANYA WOLFSON (a1), MICHAEL J. TAYLOR (a1), OMAR ALHASSOON (a1), KAIVON ARFAA (a1), RONALD J. ELLIS (a2), IGOR GRANT (a1) (a3) and THE HNRC GROUP (a1)...

Abstract

The following is a correction for an error that occurred in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 6, No. 3. The error occurred in the article titled “Personality change disorder in children and adolescents following traumatic brain injury,” pp. 279–289, by Max et al. On page 285, under the subheading “Injury Factors,” beginning with the second sentence in the first paragraph, the statement should read:

Visual inspection of the distribution of PC relative to lowest post-resuscitation GCS scores revealed that a cut-off of lowest post-resuscitation GCS score of 4 or less versus more than 4 yielded a sensitivity for a diagnosis of persistent PC of 9/14 (64.3%), specificity of 18/23 (78.3%), and a positive predictive value of 0.64 (9.14).

A cut-off of duration of impaired consciousness of 100 hr or less versus more than 100 hr yielded a sensitivity for a diagnosis of persistent PC of 11/14 (78.6%), specificity of 20/23 (87.0%), and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 0.79 (11/14).

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