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Use It or Lose It? A 5-Year Follow-up Study of Goal Management Training in Patients with Acquired Brain Injury

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2019

Sveinung Tornås*
Affiliation:
Department of Research, Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital, Nesodden, Norway
Marianne Løvstad
Affiliation:
Department of Research, Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital, Nesodden, Norway Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
Anne-Kristin Solbakk
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Department of Neuropsychology, Helgeland Hospital, Mosjøen, Norway Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway
Anne-Kristine Schanke
Affiliation:
Department of Research, Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital, Nesodden, Norway Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
Jan Stubberud
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Lovisenberg Diaconal Hospital, Oslo, Norway
*
* Correspondence and reprint requests to: Sveinung Tornås, Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital, Bjørnemyrveien, 1450 Nesoddtangen, Norway. E-mail: Sveinung.tornaas@sunnaas.no

Abstract

Objectives:

To determine the perceived 5-year outcome of Goal Management Training (GMT) for individuals with chronic acquired brain injury and executive dysfunction, when compared to a nonspecific psychoeducational intervention (Brain Health Workshop, BHW).

Methods:

Of the 67 subjects in the initial randomized controlled trial [Tornås et al. (2016). Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 1–17], 50 (GMT, n = 21; BHW, n = 29) subjects returned written consent and questionnaires (54% male, age 45.8 ± 10.9 years). The 5-year follow-up consisted of two questionnaires, including the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function for daily life executive function (EF) and Quality of Life after Brain Injury to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Changes related to daily life EF and HRQoL were assessed pre-treatment, post-treatment, 6-month follow-up, and 5-year follow-up. Data were analyzed using a 2 × 4 mixed-design ANOVA.

Results:

The findings indicate that GMT is efficacious in improving EF and HRQoL 6-month post-treatment. However, these changes failed to remain significant at 5-year follow-up.

Conclusions:

Data from 50 participants receiving either GMT or BHW suggested that the significant GMT-related improvements on perceived EF and HRQoL observed at 6-month follow-up were no longer present at 5-year follow-up. These findings indicate a need to promote maintenance of interventions post-treatment.

Type
Brief Communication
Copyright
Copyright © INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2019 

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