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A prospective study of the recovery of attention from acute to 2 years following pediatric traumatic brain injury

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 January 2005

CATHY CATROPPA
Affiliation:
Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia University of Melbourne, Australia
VICKI ANDERSON
Affiliation:
Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia University of Melbourne, Australia

Abstract

Limited research has investigated specific attentional sequelae following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI), such as sustained, selective, and shifting attention, as well as speed of processing. Little is known about the pattern of recovery of these skills or their interaction with ongoing development. The present study examined attentional abilities at acute, 6-, 12-, and 24-month time points postinjury in a group of 71 children who had sustained a mild, moderate, or severe TBI. Results indicated that children who sustained a severe TBI generally performed poorest, but showed most recovery over time. The pattern of recovery was dependent on the attentional component being measured. Specifically, deficits were most evident on more complex and timed tasks. While a number of areas showed recovery over time, for some attentional components, difficulties persisted to 24 months postinjury. (JINS, 2005, 11, 84–98.)

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2005 The International Neuropsychological Society

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