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Training, Implementation, and Potential of a Cybermentoring Scheme in Six EU Countries

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 August 2019

Peter K. Smith
Affiliation:
Goldsmiths, University of London, UK
Fran Thompson
Affiliation:
Goldsmiths, University of London, UK
John Jessel
Affiliation:
Goldsmiths, University of London, UK
Andrea Kožuchová
Affiliation:
Komunikujeme, Czech Republic
Irene Ferreira
Affiliation:
ANESPO, Portugal
Gabriela Idriceanu
Affiliation:
MISIT, Romania
Ersilia Menesini
Affiliation:
University of Florence, Italy
Margaret Miklosz
Affiliation:
CEES, Poland
Marian de Villanueva
Affiliation:
CECE, Spain
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Cybermentoring refers to virtual peer support in which young people themselves are trained as cybermentors and interact with those needing help and advice (cybermentees) online. This article describes the training in, and implementation of, a cross-national cybermentoring scheme, Beatbullying Europe, developed in the United Kingdom. It involved train-the-trainer workshops for partners and life mentors in six European countries (Italy, Spain, Portugal, Romania, Poland and the Czech Republic) in 2013–2014, followed by training sessions for pupil cybermentors aged 11–16 years. Although BeatBullying went into liquidation in November 2014, the project was largely completed. We (1) report an evaluation of the training of the life mentors and mentors, via questionnaire survey; and (2) discuss findings about the implementation of the scheme and its potential at a cross-national level, via partner interviews during and at the end of the project. The training was found to be highly rated in all respects, and in all six countries involved. The overall consensus from the data available is that there was a positive impact for the schools and professionals involved; some challenges encountered are discussed. The BeatBullying Europe project, despite being unfinished, was promising, and a similar approach deserves further support and evaluation in the future.

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Articles
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Cambridge University Press

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References

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