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The effects of short-term mindfulness-based group intervention utilising a school setting for Japanese adolescents with trauma

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 November 2020

Daisuke Ito
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Education, Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Hyogo, Japan
Yuki Kubo
Affiliation:
Oasis Clinic, Tokyo, Japan
Ayako Takii
Affiliation:
Joint Graduate School in Science of School Education, Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Hyogo, Japan
Asuka Watanabe
Affiliation:
Joint Graduate School in Science of School Education, Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Hyogo, Japan
Tetsuhiro Ohtani
Affiliation:
College of Social Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan
Shunsuke Koseki
Affiliation:
Faculty of Psychology and Education, JF Oberlin University, Tokyo, Japan
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The use of mindfulness as a tool to improve mental health has received increased attention. Schools provide ideal environments for short-term prevention and skill development for mental health. Further, teachers can promote and reinforce students’ daily use of mindfulness. This study explored the effects of a short-term group mindfulness-based intervention on the mental health of adolescents who have experienced trauma. A total of 49 high school students received a mindfulness-based intervention session followed by homework and teacher reinforcement. The results suggest that a short-term group intervention for mindfulness can potentially improve mindfulness attention awareness and reduce depression and anxiety symptoms in adolescents. As there was no control group, additional research examining the effectiveness of the intervention is essential.

Type
Practitioner Paper
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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