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A targeted approach for evaluating preclinical activity of botanical extracts for support of bone health

  • Yumei Lin (a1), Mary A. Murray (a1), I. Ross Garrett (a2) (a3), Gloria E. Gutierrez (a2) (a4), Jeffry S. Nyman (a2) (a5), Gregory Mundy (a2) (a6), David Fast (a7), Kevin W. Gellenbeck (a1), Amitabh Chandra (a7) and Shyam Ramakrishnan (a1) (a8)...

Abstract

Using a sequential in vitro/in vivo approach, we tested the ability of botanical extracts to influence biomarkers associated with bone resorption and bone formation. Pomegranate fruit and grape seed extracts were found to exhibit anti-resorptive activity by inhibiting receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in MG-63 cells and to reduce IL-1β-stimulated calvarial 45Ca loss. A combination of pomegranate fruit and grape seed extracts were shown to be effective at inhibiting bone loss in ovariectomised rats as demonstrated by standard histomorphometry, biomechanical and bone mineral density measurements. Quercetin and licorice extract exhibited bone formation activity as measured by bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) promoter activation, increased expression of BMP-2 mRNA and protein levels, and promotion of bone growth in cultured mouse calvariae. A combination of quercetin and licorice extract demonstrated a potential for increasing bone mineral density in an intact female rat model as compared with controls. The results from this sequential in vitro/in vivo research model yielded botanical extract formulas that demonstrate significant potential benefits for bone health.

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Copyright

The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license .

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Kevin W. Gellenbeck, fax +1 714 736 7605, email kevin.gellenbeck@amway.com

References

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Keywords

A targeted approach for evaluating preclinical activity of botanical extracts for support of bone health

  • Yumei Lin (a1), Mary A. Murray (a1), I. Ross Garrett (a2) (a3), Gloria E. Gutierrez (a2) (a4), Jeffry S. Nyman (a2) (a5), Gregory Mundy (a2) (a6), David Fast (a7), Kevin W. Gellenbeck (a1), Amitabh Chandra (a7) and Shyam Ramakrishnan (a1) (a8)...

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