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Processing of diamond/alumina composites for low wear applications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

May-Ying Chu*
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720
Bharat Bhushan*
Affiliation:
IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120
Lutgard C. De Jonghe
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720
*
a)Presently at PolyPlus Battery Company, Inc., 809 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, California 94710.
b)Presently at Computer Microtribology and Contamination Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210.
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Abstract

A simple hot-pressing procedure for fabricating composites of diamond particulates in an alumina matrix at moderate applied pressures is described. Dense composites with up to 33 vol. % diamond particles are made by pressure-sintering at applied stress of 35 MPa in vacuum atmosphere. Preliminary wear tests of these composites on magnetic thin-film rigid disks show a low friction comparable to that of single crystalline diamond. Diamond/alumina composites can be an economical alternative to diamond or diamond coated materials for abrasion resistant applications.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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