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Highly stable fluoride glass

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Abdessamad Elyamani
Affiliation:
Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
Elias Snitzer
Affiliation:
Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
Robert Pafchek
Affiliation:
Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
George H. Sigel Jr.
Affiliation:
Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
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Abstract

A new family of modified ZBLAN glass compositions has been synthesized which provides better stability against crystallization. A preliminary study of the Hruby factor HR shows higher values as compared to a ZBLAN glass prepared under the same conditions, utilizing similar high purity starting materials. Large rods of clear glass with a 1.5 cm diameter and up to 17 cm in length were easily obtained. Results will be presented on the physical properties and crystallization behavior of these high stability glasses.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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