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Thymoquinone treatment for inner-ear acoustic trauma in rats

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2015

F Aksoy
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
R Dogan
Affiliation:
Otorhinolaryngology Clinic, Bayrampasa State Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
A Yenigun
Affiliation:
Otorhinolaryngology Clinic, Karaman State Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
B Veyseller
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
O Ozturan
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
B Ozturk
Affiliation:
Department of Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Objective:

To investigate whether thymoquinone has any eliminative effects against inner-ear damage caused by acoustic trauma.

Methods:

Thirty-two male rats were divided into four groups. Group 1 was only exposed to acoustic trauma. Group 2 was given thymoquinone 24 hours before acoustic trauma and continued to receive it for 10 days after the trauma. Group 3 was only treated with thymoquinone, for 10 days. Group 4, the control group, suffered no trauma and received saline instead of thymoquinone. Groups 1 and 2 were exposed to acoustic trauma using 105 dB SPL white noise for 4 hours.

Results:

There was a significant decrease in distortion product otoacoustic emission values and an increase in auditory brainstem response thresholds in group 1 on days 1, 5 and 10, compared with baseline measurements. In group 2, a decrease in distortion product otoacoustic emission values and an increase in auditory brainstem response threshold were observed on day 1 after acoustic trauma, but measurements were comparable to baseline values on days 5 and 10. In group 3, thymoquinone had no detrimental effects on hearing. Similarly, the control group showed stable results.

Conclusion:

Thymoquinone was demonstrated to be a reparative rather than preventive treatment that could be used to relieve acoustic trauma.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2015 

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