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Coupling of Two SIR Epidemic Models with Variable Susceptibilities and Infectivities

  • Peter Neal (a1)

Abstract

The variable generalised stochastic epidemic model, which allows for variability in both the susceptibilities and infectivities of individuals, is analysed. A very different epidemic model which exhibits variable susceptibility and infectivity is the random-graph epidemic model. A suitable coupling of the two epidemic models is derived which enables us to show that, whilst the epidemics are very different in appearance, they have the same asymptotic final size distribution. The coupling provides a novel approach to studying random-graph epidemic models.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Postal address: School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester M60 1QD, UK. Email address: p.neal-2@manchester.ac.uk

References

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