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Selective herbicides for control of hen’s eyes (Ardisia crenata) in forests and natural areas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2019

Richard Cristan
Affiliation:
Postdoctoral Research Associate, North Florida Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Quincy, FL, USA; current: Assistant Research Professor, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY, USA
Patrick J. Minogue
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, North Florida Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Quincy, FL, USA
Stephen F. Enloe
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Agronomy Department, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Brent Sellers
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Range Cattle Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Ona, FL, USA
Anna Osiecka
Affiliation:
Senior Biological Scientist, North Florida Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Quincy, FL, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Hen’s eyes (Ardisia crenata Sims) is a shade-tolerant invasive shrub displacing native understory in forests of the Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. Few studies have explored herbicide effectiveness on A. crenata, with foliar applications of triclopyr amine or triclopyr ester typically referenced as the standard treatments. This study evaluated efficacy of eight foliar herbicide treatments and a nontreated check at three locations at 12 mo after the first treatment (12MAT1) and 12 mo after the second treatment (12MAT2) on established (greater than 8-cm high) and seedling (less than 8-cm high) A. crenata. Treatments were four triclopyr formulations: amine, ester, choline, and acid (all at 4.04 kg ae ha−1); imazamox (1.12 and 2.24 kg ae ha−1); flumioxazin (0.43 kg ai ha−1); and triclopyr amine plus flumioxazin (4.04 + 0.43 kg ae ha−1). At 12MAT1, triclopyr ester, the high rate of imazamox, and triclopyr acid resulted in greater control of established A. crenata than any other herbicide (68%, 66%, and 64%, respectively). At 12MAT2, all herbicides except flumioxazin resulted in some control of A. crenata. Triclopyr ester, triclopyr acid, and the high rate of imazamox provided 95%, 93%, and 92% control, respectively. Triclopyr choline did not perform as well as the acid or ester formulations, and the tank mix of flumioxazin and triclopyr amine did not improve control over triclopyr amine alone. This study identified triclopyr acid and imazamox (2.24 kg ae ha−1) as new options for A. crenata control and indicated variation in the performance among the four triclopyr formulations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2019 

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Steven S. Seefeldt, Washington State University

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