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A SiGe transceiver chipset for automotive radar applications using wideband modulation sequences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2019

Jan Schoepfel
Affiliation:
Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany
Simon Kueppers
Affiliation:
Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany
Klaus Aufinger
Affiliation:
Infineon Technologies AG, D-85579 Neubiberg, Germany
Nils Pohl
Affiliation:
Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany
Corresponding

Abstract

This paper presents a W-band MIMO radar transceiver chipset for automotive applications, based on a Silicon Germanium technology. It consists of a reference VCO, operating at a center frequency of 38 GHz and a companion IC that comprises a complete millimeter-wave transceiver at 76 GHz. This chipset enables building multipurpose MIMO radar systems that can be scaled in terms of transmitter and receiver count. What makes this system innovative is the fact that it is able to handle more broadband signals than systems presented in current literature and is furthermore not limited to one modulation scheme. The chipset is capable of transmitting and receiving any signal waveform. The main goal of this work was to create a functional version of a VCO and a one-channel transceiver MMIC. Furthermore a demonstrator for a proof of concept was designed to test the MMICs on a system level. The realized VCO MMIC achieves a tuning frequency range of 6 GHz with a center frequency of 38 GHz and consumes 152 mW from a 3.3 V supply. The transceiver MMIC is fully functional and achieves a saturated output power of 11.5 dBm while drawing 670 mW from a 3.3 V supply.

Type
EuMW 2018
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and the European Microwave Association 2019 

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References

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