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Design and implementation of 2.5D frequency-selective surface based on substrate-integrated waveguide technology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2019

Krushna Kanth Varikuntla
Affiliation:
Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, National Institute of Technology Tiruchirappalli, Trichy, India
Raghavan Singaravelu
Affiliation:
Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, National Institute of Technology Tiruchirappalli, Trichy, India
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

In this paper, the patch-type frequency selective surfaces (FSS) based on substrate-integrated waveguide (SIW) technology is proposed to improve the bandwidth (BW) and angular performance. The proposed FSS configuration overcomes the limitations of both conventional 2D and 3D FSS structures. A closely coupled cascaded mechanism is employed to combine two identical FSS elements separated by thin dielectric substrate results in incorporation of SIW technology; hence, named as 2.5D FSS. A derived equivalent circuit model is used to estimate the basic performance of proposed FSS–SIW elements, and the response of analytical expressions has been validated and final design is obtained using full-wave simulations. Two basic FSS elements viz. single square loop and a Jerusalem cross have been investigated to prove the enhancement in their BW and angular stability. The proposed technique evidently improves the BW and angular stability of FSS structures than in its established form. Besides, various important parameters that influence the performance characteristics of reported 2.5D FSSs are also studied. The important observations made on the thickness, as the thickness increases the bandstop FSS, can change to bandpass FSS. Finally, the proposed FSS structure has been fabricated and measured using free space measurement setup, to show the effectiveness of theoretical results. The measured results show good agreement with simulated results at normal and oblique incidence angle.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and the European Microwave Association 2019 

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