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The Past, Present, and Future of Healthcare-Associated Infection Prevention in Pediatrics: Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Kristina A. Bryant
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky
Danielle M. Zerr
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle
W. Charles Huskins
Affiliation:
College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Aaron M. Milstone
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Central line–associated bloodstream infections cause morbidity and mortality in children. We explore the evidence for prevention of central line–associated bloodstream infections in children, assess current practices, and propose research topics to improve prevention strategies.

Type
Supplement Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2010

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References

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