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Platelet and Plasmatic Lipidic Profile as Potential Marker of Bipolar Disorders: Preliminary Findings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

L. Sideli
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Palermo, Italy
A. Mule’
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Palermo, Italy
F. Damiani
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Palermo, Italy
M. Corso
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Palermo, Italy
S. Montana
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Palermo, Italy
M. Caprin
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Palermo, Italy
G. Colli
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Palermo, Italy
S. Di Giacomo
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Palermo, Italy
D. Catalano
Affiliation:
Medical Biotechnologies and Legal Medicine, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
M. Greco
Affiliation:
Medical Biotechnologies and Legal Medicine, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
F. Di Gaudio
Affiliation:
Medical Biotechnologies and Legal Medicine, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
D. La Barbera
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Palermo, Italy

Abstract

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Introduction

Although the diagnosis of bipolar disorder is currently based on clinical criteria, preliminary studies showed that palmitic and arachidonic acid levels are able to discriminate adult patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) from those with bipolar disorder (BD).

Objectives

To replicate and to expand previous findings by investigating the relation between mood disorders and platelet and plasmatic fatty levels.

Aims

To compare the lipidic profile of individuals with different mood disorder (MDD vs. BD) and to investigate the relation with specific clinical features (duration of illness, attempted suicide, psychotic symptoms).

Methods

Potential participants were recruited from the outpatient and inpatient psychiatric units of the university hospital of Palermo (Italy). Diagnosis of DSM IV mood disorders was made using the MINI. Symptom severity was assessed using the HAM-D rating scale and the YMRS. Fatty acid profile was analyzed using mass spectrometry.

Results

Preliminary analyses were performed on 8 patients with MDD and 6 with BD. Groups were similar in terms of demographic variables. Patients with MDD showed highest levels of platelet palmitic acid, stearic acid, and arachidonic acid. Furthermore, plasmatic docosahexaenoic acid was negatively related with manic symptoms severity (Rho = –0.697; P = 0.025) and platelet alpha linolenic acid was positively related with illness duration (Rho = 0.845; P = 0.040).

Conclusions

These preliminary findings suggest that platelet fatty acids may be possible biological markers to improve the diagnosis of BD.

Disclosure of interest

The authors have not supplied their declaration of competing interest.

Type
e-poster walk: Bipolar disorders – Part 2
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2017
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