Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Article contents

P03-247 - The Use Of Benzodiazepines Among Patients Hospitalized In Medical Services

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 April 2020

E. Ochoa Mangado
Affiliation:
Servicio de Psiquiatria, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain
D.C. de la Vega
Affiliation:
Servicio de Psiquiatria, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain
A. Regidor Bonafonte
Affiliation:
Servicio de Psiquiatria, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain
R. Gómez Soler
Affiliation:
Servicio de Psiquiatria, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain
R. Martínez de Velasco Soriano
Affiliation:
Servicio de Psiquiatria, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain

Abstract

Objectives

Benzodiazepines are commonly prescribed since the 1960, when they replaced barbiturics. Although there is no doubt about their efficacy in treating anxiety, insomnia or other psychiatric disorders, we should also take into account the fact that these drugs are easily misused.

In this work we analyze the intake of benzodiazepines among patients hospitalized due to medical problems.

Methods

Retrospective review of clinical histories of patients attended by the Drug Unit of the Psychiatry Service in the last twelve months. Bibliographical review of the theme. Data analyzed using the SPSS software 15.0 version.

Results

45 patients were subjected to our survey, 41 of them male. 66% were HIV Positive patients, and the most frequent cause of hospitalization was pneumonia (51’1%). Most of the patients attended were drug abusers (see the graphic below). When the benzodiazepines abusers were asked how they obtained them, 40’6% recognized the got them without prescription, 25% said they got them legally, and 34’4 answered that they got them legally but also without prescription. 62’5% of the patients usually took alprazolam.

Conclusions

Benzodiazepine abuse, in particular alprazolam, is quiet common among the patients we see.

In half of the cases the use of benzodiazepines could have worsen the prognosis of the patients.

Type
Substance related disorders
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2010
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 10 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 17th April 2020 - 18th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access
Hostname: page-component-77fc7d77f9-2nq4t Total loading time: 0.643 Render date: 2021-01-18T08:55:57.326Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "1", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Mon Jan 18 2021 08:03:19 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": true, "languageSwitch": true, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

P03-247 - The Use Of Benzodiazepines Among Patients Hospitalized In Medical Services
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

P03-247 - The Use Of Benzodiazepines Among Patients Hospitalized In Medical Services
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

P03-247 - The Use Of Benzodiazepines Among Patients Hospitalized In Medical Services
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *