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Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorders (OSFED): Clinical heterogeneity and cognitive-behavioral therapy outcome

  • Nadine Riesco (a1), Zaida Agüera (a1) (a2), Roser Granero (a2) (a3), Susana Jiménez-Murcia (a1) (a2) (a4), José M. Menchón (a1) (a4) (a5) and Fernando Fernández-Aranda (a1) (a2) (a4)...

Abstract

Background:

with the DSM-5 new eating disorders (EDs) diagnostic subtypes were identified within the Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorders (OSFED) category, which have so far been under-researched. Objectives of this study were to examine differential features among OSFED subtypes, exploring short-term cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) response and identifying clinical predictors of therapy outcome.

Methods:

the sample included 176 female patients diagnosed with OSFED [82 atypical anorexia nervosa (atypical-AN), 57 purging disorder (PD), and 37 subthreshold bulimia nervosa (sub-BN)]. Assessment included eating-related, psychopathological and personality measures.

Results:

results showed similar clinical and personality profiles between the diagnostic subtypes, with hardly any differences, only observable in the core symptoms of each diagnosis. The sub-BN group was the one which showed more social impairment. Regarding treatment outcome, the three groups did not reveal significant differences in remission rates, therapeutic adherence or dropout rates, reaching rates of dropout from 36.8% to 50% (p =.391). However, different ED subtype predictors appear related with full remission or dropout risk, specifically personality traits.

Conclusions:

our results suggest that OSFED patients may benefit similarly from the same CBT outpatient group approach. However, high dropout rates and low motivation seems to be an important limitation and challenge for future approaches.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding authors at: Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital of Bellvitge-IDIBELL and CIBEROBN, c/ Feixa Llarga s/n, 08907, Barcelona, Spain. zaguera@bellvitgehospital.catffernandez@bellvitgehospital.cat

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Shared first authorship.

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References

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Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorders (OSFED): Clinical heterogeneity and cognitive-behavioral therapy outcome

  • Nadine Riesco (a1), Zaida Agüera (a1) (a2), Roser Granero (a2) (a3), Susana Jiménez-Murcia (a1) (a2) (a4), José M. Menchón (a1) (a4) (a5) and Fernando Fernández-Aranda (a1) (a2) (a4)...

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Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorders (OSFED): Clinical heterogeneity and cognitive-behavioral therapy outcome

  • Nadine Riesco (a1), Zaida Agüera (a1) (a2), Roser Granero (a2) (a3), Susana Jiménez-Murcia (a1) (a2) (a4), José M. Menchón (a1) (a4) (a5) and Fernando Fernández-Aranda (a1) (a2) (a4)...
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