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Moment-to-moment associations between emotional disturbances, aberrant salience and persecutory delusions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

S.H. So
Affiliation:
The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Psychology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong S.A.R
A.K.C. Chau
Affiliation:
The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Psychology, Hong Kong, Hong Kong S.A.R
E. Peters
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry- Psychology and Neuroscience, London, United Kingdom
J. Swendsen
Affiliation:
University of Bordeaux, Aquitaine Institute for Cognitive and Integrative Neuroscience, Bordeaux, France
P. Garety
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry- Psychology and Neuroscience, London, United Kingdom
S. Kapur
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne, Faculty of Medicine Dentistry and Health Sciences, Melbourne, Australia

Abstract

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Introduction

Experiences of depression and anxiety are common among patients with persecutory delusions. It has been theorized that emotional disturbances affect the formation and appraisal of persecutory delusions directly and possibly via increasing the sense of aberrant salience.

Objectives

Using a time-lagged analysis of experience sampling data, this study modelled the role of momentary levels of negative emotions and aberrant salience in maintaining persecutory delusions in patients with active delusions.

Methods

Clinically acute participants with at least a mild level of persecutory delusions were assessed using experience sampling method (ESM; 7 entries per day for 14 days) and clinical rating scales. ESM data of participants who completed at least 30 ESM entries were analysed by using multilevel regression modelling.

Results

The final sample consisted of 14 participants, with a total of 1161 momentary observations. Time-lagged analysis revealed that both negative emotions (B = 0.125, P = .009) and aberrant salience (B = 0.267, P< .001) predicted an increase in persecutory delusions in the next moment. Conversely, persecutory delusions did not predict change in negative emotions or change in aberrant salience in the next moment (ps> .05). Negative emotions also predicted an increase in aberrant salience in the next moment (B = 0.087, P = .009).

Conclusions

Our results supported the hypothesis that both negative emotions and aberrant salience exacerbate persecutory delusions, rather than being merely the sequelae of the symptoms. Our results suggested both direct and indirect (via aberrant salience) pathways from negative emotions to persecutory delusions.

Disclosure of interest

The authors have not supplied their declaration of competing interest.

Type
e-Poster Viewing: Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2017
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