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A meta-analysis of gene (5-HTT) × environment interactions in eating pathology using secondary data analyses

  • V. Rozenblat (a1), D. Ng (a1), M. Fuller-Tyszkiewicz (a2), K. Akkermann (a3), D. Collier (a4), R. Engels (a5), F. Fernandez-Aranda (a6), J. Harro (a7), A. Karwautz (a8), J. Homberg (a9), K. Klump (a10), S. Racine (a11), C. Larson (a12), H. Steiger (a13), J. Richardson (a14), S. Stoltenberg (a15), T. van Strien (a16), G. Wagner (a8), J. Treasure (a17) and I. Krug (a18)...

Abstract

Background

Gene × environment (G × E) interactions in eating pathology have been increasingly investigated, however studies have been limited by sample size due to the difficulty of obtaining genetic data.

Objective

To synthesize existing G × E research in the eating disorders (ED) field and provide a clear picture of the current state of knowledge with analyses of larger samples.

Method

Complete data from seven studies investigating community (n = 1750, 64.5% female) and clinical (n = 426, 100% female) populations, identified via systematic review, were included. Data were combined to perform five analyses: 5-HTTLPR × Traumatic Life Events (0–17 events) to predict ED status (n = 909), 5-HTTLPR × Sexual and Physical Abuse (n = 1097) to predict bulimic symptoms, 5-HTLPR × Depression to predict bulimic symptoms (n = 1256), and 5-HTTLPR × Impulsivity to predict disordered eating (n = 1149).

Results

The low function (s) allele of 5-HTTLPR interacted with number of traumatic life events (P < .01) and sexual and physical abuse (P < .05) to predict increased likelihood of an ED in females but not males (Fig. 1). No other G × E interactions were significant, possibly due to the medium to low compatibility between datasets (Fig. 1).

Conclusion

Early promising results suggest that increased knowledge of G × E interactions could be achieved if studies increased uniformity of measuring ED and environmental variables, allowing for continued collaboration to overcome the restrictions of obtaining genetic samples.

Disclosure of interest

The authors have not supplied their declaration of competing interest.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author.

A meta-analysis of gene (5-HTT) × environment interactions in eating pathology using secondary data analyses

  • V. Rozenblat (a1), D. Ng (a1), M. Fuller-Tyszkiewicz (a2), K. Akkermann (a3), D. Collier (a4), R. Engels (a5), F. Fernandez-Aranda (a6), J. Harro (a7), A. Karwautz (a8), J. Homberg (a9), K. Klump (a10), S. Racine (a11), C. Larson (a12), H. Steiger (a13), J. Richardson (a14), S. Stoltenberg (a15), T. van Strien (a16), G. Wagner (a8), J. Treasure (a17) and I. Krug (a18)...

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A meta-analysis of gene (5-HTT) × environment interactions in eating pathology using secondary data analyses

  • V. Rozenblat (a1), D. Ng (a1), M. Fuller-Tyszkiewicz (a2), K. Akkermann (a3), D. Collier (a4), R. Engels (a5), F. Fernandez-Aranda (a6), J. Harro (a7), A. Karwautz (a8), J. Homberg (a9), K. Klump (a10), S. Racine (a11), C. Larson (a12), H. Steiger (a13), J. Richardson (a14), S. Stoltenberg (a15), T. van Strien (a16), G. Wagner (a8), J. Treasure (a17) and I. Krug (a18)...
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