Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-6pznq Total loading time: 2.169 Render date: 2021-03-03T14:18:21.394Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Article contents

Improving medical student empathy: Initial findings on the use of a book club and an old age simulation suit

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

L. Chester
Affiliation:
NELFT, Medical Education, London, United Kingdom
M. Fernando
Affiliation:
NELFT, Medical Education, London, United Kingdom
A. Jebreel
Affiliation:
NELFT, Medical Education, London, United Kingdom
M. Devine
Affiliation:
NELFT, Medical Education, London, United Kingdom
M. Bhat
Affiliation:
NELFT, Medical Education, London, United Kingdom

Abstract

Introduction

Empathy is critical to the development of professionalism in medical students, but evidence suggests that empathy actually declines over the course of undergraduate medical education.

Objectives

Improving medical student empathy by encouraging students to think about the person behind the illness.

Methods

Two interventions were studied. From December 2015 until November 2016, a fourth year psychiatry medical student book club was conducted. Students were asked to read an autobiography of a lived experience of psychosis. The old age simulation suit aims to simulate the sensory and physical impairments faced by older adults with age related illnesses. A training session provided a transient experience of old age for the students.

Results

Forty-four students completed the feedback on the book club. Twenty-eight (64%) stated that they strongly agreed with the statement ‘the book club encouraged me to consider the person behind the illness’. Thirty-nine (89%) stated that after attending the book club their empathy towards people with mental health problems had increased. Eleven students completed full feedback following the old age simulation session. Empathy statements relating to living in an ageing body improved from the pre-test median score of 4 (range 1–7) to a median score of 6 (range 2–8) post-teaching session. Empathy statements focusing on sensory and physical impairments had pre-test score median of 3 (range 1–7) and post-test median 8 (range 3–9).

Conclusions

Feedback from these sessions has demonstrated that with a little creativity, empathy training can be delivered to medical students with a positive impact.

Disclosure of interest

The authors have not supplied their declaration of competing interest.

Type
e-Poster viewing: Training in psychiatry
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2017
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 25 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 23rd March 2020 - 3rd March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Improving medical student empathy: Initial findings on the use of a book club and an old age simulation suit
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Improving medical student empathy: Initial findings on the use of a book club and an old age simulation suit
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Improving medical student empathy: Initial findings on the use of a book club and an old age simulation suit
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *