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Clinical features of kinesthetic hallucinations in cocaine-dependent patients

  • C. Roncero (a1) (a2), L. Rodriguez-Cintas (a1) (a2), L. Grau-López (a1) (a2), E. Ros-Cucurull (a2), J. Perez-Pazos (a1), C. Barral (a1) (a2), F. Palma-Alvarez (a1), V. Barrau (a1), A. Herrrero-Fernandez (a1), N. Vela (a1), D. Romero (a1), M. Sorribes (a1), M. Casas (a2) (a3), A. Egido (a1), J. Alvaros (a1) and C. Daigre (a1) (a4)...

Abstract

Introduction

Legal and illegal drugs can cause psychotic symptoms, in cocaine-dependent patients the prevalence of these symptoms may reach 86% (Vorspan, 2012). It is estimated that 13–32% of cocaine-dependent patients have kinaesthetic hallucinations (Siegel, 1978; Mahoney, 2008; Roncero, 2012).

Objectives

To compare the prevalence of substance-induced psychotic symptoms and compare the use of welfare/social resources and social adjustment among cocaine-dependent patients (CD) and other substances dependences (OtherD).

Methods

Two hundred and six patients seeking treatment at the Addictions and Dual Diagnosis Unit of the Vall d’Hebron. Patients were assessed by ad hoc questionnaire designed to collect demographic data and psychotic symptoms associated with consumption, a record of the care/social resources used by the patient and the scale of social adaptation (SASS). A descriptive and bivariate analysis of the data was performed.

Results

CD were 47.1% vs. 52.9% OtherD (66.1% alcohol, 17.4% cannabis, 8.3% opioid, 8.3% benzodiazepines/other drugs). Of cocaine dependent-patients, 65.6% present psychotic symptoms vs. 32.1% for the OtherD. Different exhibiting psychotic symptoms are: self-referential (69.7% vs. 30.7%), delusions of persecution (43.4% vs. 12.2%), hallucinations (49.4% vs. 14.3%), auditory hallucinations (43.5% vs. 11.4%), visual hallucinations (30.4% vs. 5.7%) and kinaesthetic hallucinations (7.2% vs. 2.9%).

Cocaine-dependent patients significantly use more health care resources in reference addiction unit (76.3% vs. 62.4%, P:.035) and infectious diseases (22.7% vs. 5.5%, P:.000) and justice-related (50.5% vs. 26 resources 0.6%; P:1.001) and less resources and mental health (25.8% vs. 43.1%; P:.013).

Regarding social adaptation, no differences were found in the SASS. Kinaesthetic hallucinations do not appear to be related to a greater use of resources and in social adaptation.

References not available.

Disclosure of interest

The authors have not supplied their declaration of competing interest.

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Corresponding author

* Corresponding author.

Clinical features of kinesthetic hallucinations in cocaine-dependent patients

  • C. Roncero (a1) (a2), L. Rodriguez-Cintas (a1) (a2), L. Grau-López (a1) (a2), E. Ros-Cucurull (a2), J. Perez-Pazos (a1), C. Barral (a1) (a2), F. Palma-Alvarez (a1), V. Barrau (a1), A. Herrrero-Fernandez (a1), N. Vela (a1), D. Romero (a1), M. Sorribes (a1), M. Casas (a2) (a3), A. Egido (a1), J. Alvaros (a1) and C. Daigre (a1) (a4)...

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Clinical features of kinesthetic hallucinations in cocaine-dependent patients

  • C. Roncero (a1) (a2), L. Rodriguez-Cintas (a1) (a2), L. Grau-López (a1) (a2), E. Ros-Cucurull (a2), J. Perez-Pazos (a1), C. Barral (a1) (a2), F. Palma-Alvarez (a1), V. Barrau (a1), A. Herrrero-Fernandez (a1), N. Vela (a1), D. Romero (a1), M. Sorribes (a1), M. Casas (a2) (a3), A. Egido (a1), J. Alvaros (a1) and C. Daigre (a1) (a4)...
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