Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Corporal Punishment in Late Modern English Dialects (an analysis based on EDD Online): How beating has been reflected in ‘the language of the people’

  • Manfred Markus

Extract

It is a sad fact that physical violence and, as a subtype, the corporal punishment of children and juveniles, practised by parents and other guardians, schools and clergy in both Europe and North America, have been part of our ‘Western’, i.e. Christian, cultural heritage, not to mention other world-cultures. I myself am old enough to remember the various common practices of physical violence used on children in the 1950s. At school in Germany, caning and face-slapping were officially tolerated and quite common, applied as a kind of educational instrument, sometimes even to 17-year-olds. In state-run schools of the United Kingdom, corporal punishment was politically banned only in 1986. Private schools followed suit from 1998 (England and Wales) to 2003 (Northern Ireland) (Country report for UK, 2015). In the United States, corporal punishment is still lawful in 19 states, in both public and private schools (Country report for USA, 2016).

Copyright

References

Hide All
Concise Oxford Dictionary. 1951 (1911). Fowler, H. W. & Fowler, F. G. (eds.) (Based on the Oxford Dictionary, 1/1911, 4th edn., rev. E. McIntosh.) Oxford: Clarendon Press.
‘Country report for UK’. Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children. June 2015. Online at <http://www.endcorporalpunishment.org/progress/country-reports/uk.html> (Accessed October 18, 2016).
Country report for USA’. Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children. Updated July 2016. Online at <http://www.endcorporalpunishment.org/progress/country-reports/usa.html> (Accessed October 18, 2016).
Clover, C. 1980. ‘The Germanic Context of the UnferÞ Episode.’ Speculum, 55, 444468.
Cobbe, F. P. 1999. From ‘Wife Torture in England.’ In Jump, H. D. (ed.), Women's Writing of the Victorian Period, 1837–1901: An Anthology. New York: St. Martin's Press, pp. 223226.
Crone, R. 2012. Violent Victorians: Popular Entertainment in Nineteenth-Century London. Manchester: Manchester University Press.
Dodenhoff, J. 2008. ‘“A dangerous kind”: Domestic Violence and the Victorian Middle Class.’ Journal of Student Scholarship, X, 14.
EDD Online. Online at <> (Accessed August 18, 2017).
Geltner, G. 2015. Flogging Others. Corporal Punishment and Cultural Identity from Antiquity to the Present. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press.
Jucker, A. H. & Taavitsainen, I. 2000. ‘Diachronic speech act analysis: Insults from Flyting to Flaming.’ Journal of Historical Pragmatics 1(1), 6795.
Keating, P. J. 1971. The Working Classes in Victorian Fiction. London, Boston and Henley: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
Markus, M. 2017. Manual of EDD Online. Online at <> (Accessed August 18, 2017).
New National Song Book. n.d. (c. 1960). Stanford, C. V. & Shaw, G. (eds.) London, etc.: Boosey & Hawkes.
Pellis, S. M. & Pellis, V. C. 2009. The Playful Brain. Venturing to the Limits of Neuroscience. London: Oneworld Publications.
Wright, J. 1898–1905. English Dialect Dictionary. 6 vols. Oxford, etc.: Henry Frowde.

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Corporal Punishment in Late Modern English Dialects (an analysis based on EDD Online): How beating has been reflected in ‘the language of the people’

  • Manfred Markus

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.