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Liberation linguistics and the Quirk Concern

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 October 2008

Abstract

A reply to ‘Language varieties and standard language’ by Sir Randolph Quirk in ET21 (Jan 90)


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1991

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