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Stable and unstable choices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2019

Anders Herlitz
Affiliation:
Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm, Sweden
Corresponding
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Abstract

This paper introduces a condition for rational choice that states that accepting decision methods and normative theories that sometimes entail that the act of choosing a maximal alternative renders this alternative non-maximal is irrational. The paper illustrates how certain distributive theories that ascribe importance to what the status quo is violate this condition and argues that they thereby should be rejected.

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© Cambridge University Press 2019 

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