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THE ANTINOMIES OF RACIAL CHANGE

  • Lawrence D. Bobo (a1)

Extract

Discussions of complexity and change in matters of ethnoracial relations often obscure as much as they describe and illuminate. In part, this is so because such distinctions, racial ones in particular, are not now nor have they ever been fixed, static, and natural categories. They are instead malleable social constructions. In part, it is so because expressly ideological projects are typically embedded within the claims scholars make about ethnoracial patterns. Consider the assertion that hybridity and mixture are ending the relevance of race, or that global population flows, massive immigration, and “super-diversity” will, likewise, render notions of race passé. The trouble here is that the crossing of socially imposed lines of race and ethnicity, as well as contact among diverse peoples, has long characterized the human experience.

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Copyright

References

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Bobo, Lawrence D. (2012). An American Conundrum: Race, Sociology, and the African American Road to Citizenship. In Gate, Henry Louis Jr.et al. (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of African American Citizenship, 1865-Present, pp. 1970. New York: Oxford University Press.
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Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race
  • ISSN: 1742-058X
  • EISSN: 1742-0598
  • URL: /core/journals/du-bois-review-social-science-research-on-race
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