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Remobilizing Dance Studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 December 2016

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Abstract

This essay uses as its case study the reconstruction of an East German Vietnamese socialist folk dance Spring in Vietnam (1969) to reflect on Randy Martin's 1998 conviction that Dance Studies has the potential to embody and materialize solutions to intellectual and political issues that have been left out of other academic disciplines. Written as a play script, the essays performs a remobilization of Dance Studies and its potential to reflect on its disciplinary authority.

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Copyright © Congress on Research in Dance 2016 

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