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Dementia Care Knowledge Sharing within a First Nations Community*

  • Dorothy Forbes (a1), Catherine Blake (a2), Emily Thiessen (a1), Sara Finkelstein (a3), Maggie Gibson (a4), Debra G. Morgan (a5), Maureen Markle-Reid (a6) and Ivan Culum (a7)...

Abstract

This article discusses the First Nations sample of a larger study on dementia care decisions and knowledge sharing. The purpose is to enhance understanding of the process of knowledge sharing among health care practitioners (HCPs), care partners, and persons with dementia (PWDs) within a rural First Nations community. A constructivist grounded theory methodology was used. Nineteen interviews were conducted at three points in time with two dementia care networks that included two PWDs, three care partners, and two HCPs. A sharing dementia care knowledge model was conceived, with the PWDs and their care partners at the centre. Knowledge sharing in the model was represented by three broad themes: (1) developing trusting relationships, (2) accessing and adapting the information, and (3) applying the information. Culturally sensitive approaches were essential to developing trusting relationships. Once developed, knowledge sharing through accessing, adapting, and applying the information was possible.

Cet article discute l’échantillon d’une étude des Premières Nations plus vaste sur les décisions de soins de la démence et le partage des connaissances. L’objectif de cette étude est de mieux comprendre le processus de partage des connaissances entre les praticiens de la santé (PS), les partenaires de soins, et les personnes atteintes de démence (PAD) au sein d’une communauté rurale des Premières Nations. Une méthodologie de la théorie constructiviste ancrée a été utilisée. Dix-neuf entrevues ont ete menées à trois reprises avec deux réseaux de soins de la démence qui comprenait deux PAD, trois partenaires de soins, et deux PS. Un modèle, “Partage des connaissances sur les soins de la démence,” a été conçue, centrée sur les PAD et leurs partenaires de soins. Trois grands thèmes du partage des connaissances sont representées dans le modèle: (1) le développement des relations de confiance, (2) l’accès et l’adaptation aux informations, et (3) application des informations. Des approches sensibles à la culture sont essentiels pour le développement des relations de confiance. Une fois que les relations ont été développées, le partage des connaissances grâce à l’accès, l’adaptation et l’application des informations est devenu possible.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence and requests for offprints should be sent to / La correspondance et les demandes de tirés-à-part doivent être addressees: Dorothy Forbes, Ph.D. Faculty of Nursing, Level 3 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy 11405 87 Avenue University of Alberta Edmonton, AB T6G 1C9 (dorothy.forbes@ualberta.ca)

Footnotes

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Funding for this study – Developing Quality Dementia Care Decisions through Knowledge Exchange in Rural Settings – was gratefully received from the Alzheimer Society of Canada, in partnership with the Canadian Nurses Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research – Institute of Aging.

Footnotes

References

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Keywords

Dementia Care Knowledge Sharing within a First Nations Community*

  • Dorothy Forbes (a1), Catherine Blake (a2), Emily Thiessen (a1), Sara Finkelstein (a3), Maggie Gibson (a4), Debra G. Morgan (a5), Maureen Markle-Reid (a6) and Ivan Culum (a7)...

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