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Trends in entry to RCPSC neurosurgery residency training through the CaRMS match since loss of eligibility for ABNS certification

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 June 2015

MK Tso
Affiliation:
(Calgary)
JM Findlay
Affiliation:
(Edmonton)
SP Lownie
Affiliation:
(London)
MC Wallace
Affiliation:
(Kingston)
BD Toyota
Affiliation:
(Vancouver)
IG Fleetwood
Affiliation:
(Victoria)
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Abstract

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Background: After July 16, 1997, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) trainees in neurosurgery were no longer eligible for American Board of Neurological Surgeons (ABNS) certification. It was anticipated that this would lead to an influx of neurosurgeons in Canada. Methods: We analyzed historical Canadian Residency Matching Service (CaRMS) data for 1997–2014 for trends in neurosurgery residency positions offered, vacancy rates, resident demographics and other pertinent data. Results: A mean of 0.94% of medical students applied to neurosurgery as their first choice (range: 0.54%-1.79%). Comparing 2 consecutive time periods (1997–2005 vs. 2006–2014), the mean number of neurosurgery entry positions per year increased from 14 to 19, while mean applicant numbers increased from 24 to 28, respectively. Ninety-five percent of those accepted into neurosurgery ranked it as their first choice discipline and few candidates who ranked neurosurgery highest were unmatched. Women applying to neurosurgery as their first choice discipline were equally likely to match as men (84% vs. 85%) and comprised 28% of neurosurgery residents selected since 2008 (vs. 14% in 1997–2007). Conclusions: The number of neurosurgery CaRMS positions and applicants have increased since 1997. This will have implications for neurosurgical workforce planning and physician employment in Canada.

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences Inc. 2015 
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