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The Significance of Frontal Intermittent Rhythmic Delta Activity in Children

  • Shay Menascu (a1) (a2), Ismail Mohamed (a3), Shany M. Tshechmer (a4), Manohar Shroff (a5) (a6) and Miguel A. Cortez (a1) (a6)...

Abstract

Objective:

To determine the correlation between frontal intermittent rhythmic delta activity (FIRDA) and the clinical and radiological correlates in children.

Methods:

Retrospective review of the EEG and imaging studies of 37 children with documented FIRDA.

Results:

FIRDA was associated with multiple neurological conditions and not necessarily with midline lesions. Patients with abnormal neurological exam had a longer FIRDA duration (average 9.5 seconds) compared to children with no reported abnormal examination (average of 6.5 seconds). FIRDA ranged from 2 to 2.5 Hz (n=15), 3 Hz (n=17) and from 1.5 to 3 Hz (n=5) and there was a significant association between the duration of FIRDA and abnormal laboratory tests (p. < 0.05, Student's T test).

Conclusion:

FIRDA was not correlated with midline brain lesions in children. FIRDA may be a non specific oscillation of an unhealthy pediatric brain with or without seizures.

RÉSUMÉ: Objectif:

Le but de l’étude était de déterminer la corrélation entre l’activité delta rythmique intermittente frontale (ADRIF) et les constatations cliniques et radiologiques chez les enfants.

Méthodes:

Nous avons procédé à une revue retrospective des EEG et de l’imagerie chez 37 enfants présentant une ADRIF documentée.

Résultats:

L’ADRIF était associée à plusieurs maladies neurologiques, pas nécessairement des atteintes de structures médianes. Les patients don’t l’examen neurologique était anormal présentaient une ADRIF dont la durée était plus longue (moyenne de 9,5 secondes) comparée à celle d’enfants dont l’examen neurologique était normal (moyenne de 6,5 secondes). L’ADRIF était de 2 à 2,5 Hz (n = 15), de 3 Hz (n = 17) et de 1,5 à 3 Hz (n = 5) et il y avait une association significative entre la durée de l’ADRIF et les examens de laboratoire anormaux (p < 0,05, test t de Student).

Conclusion:

L’ADRIF n’était pas corrélée à des lésions cérébrales médianes chez les enfants. Il est possible que l’ADRIF soit une oscillation non spécifique d’un cerveau d’enfant malade, avec ou sans crises convlsives.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Division of Neurology, 555 University Avenue Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X8, Canada.

References

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The Significance of Frontal Intermittent Rhythmic Delta Activity in Children

  • Shay Menascu (a1) (a2), Ismail Mohamed (a3), Shany M. Tshechmer (a4), Manohar Shroff (a5) (a6) and Miguel A. Cortez (a1) (a6)...

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