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Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained? Navigating Disease-Modifying Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis

  • Jodie M. Burton (a1) and Anthony Traboulsee (a2)
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Abstract

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Jodie M. Burton, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 4N1. Email: jodie.burton@albertahealthservices.ca

References

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5. Coles, AJ, Twyman, CL, Arnold, DL, et al. Alemtuzumab for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis after disease-modifying therapy: a randomised controlled phase 3 trial. Lancet. 2012;380:1829-1839.
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13. Gold, R, Kappos, L, Arnold, DL, et al. Placebo-controlled phase 3 study of oral BG-12 for relapsing multiple sclerosis. N Engl J Med. 2012;367(12):1098-1107.
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16. Holmoy, T, von der Lippe, H, Leegaard, TM. Listeria monocytogenes infection associated with alemtuzumab – a case for better preventive strategies. BMC Neurol 2017; 17: 65.

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