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Multiple Sclerosis Mortality Rates in Canada, 1975-2009

  • Sharon A. Warren (a1), Wonita Janzen (a1), Kenneth G. Warren (a2), Lawrence W. Svenson (a3) and Donald P. Schopflocher (a4)...

Abstract

Background: This study examined mortality due to multiple sclerosis (MS) in Canada, 1975-2009 to determine whether there has been a change in age at death relative to the general population and decrease in MS mortality rates. Methods: Mortality rates/100,000 population for MS and all causes were calculated using data derived from Statistics Canada, age-standardized to the 2006 population. Results: The average annual Canadian MS mortality rate, 1975-2009 was 1.23/100,000. Five-year rates for 1975-79, 1980-84, 1985-89, 1990-94, 1995-99, 2000-04, 2005-09 were: 1.16, 0.94, 1.01, 1.16, 1.30, 1.43, 1.33. Trend analysis showed mortality rates over the entire 35 years were stable (average annual percent change of less than one percent). The average annual 1975-2009 rates for females and males were 1.45 and 0.99. Five-year female rates were always higher than males. Regardless of gender, there was a decrease in MS mortality rates in the 0-39 age group and increases in the 60-69, 70-79, and 80+ groups over time. In contrast, there were decreases in all-cause mortality rates across each age group. The highest MS mortality rates for 1975-2009 were consistently in the 50-59 and 60-69 groups for both genders, while the highest all-cause mortality rates were in the 80+ group. Conclusions: Changes in the age distribution of MS mortality rates indicate a shift to later age at death, possibly due to improved health care. However MS patients remain disadvantaged relative to the general population and changes in age at death are not reflected in decreased mortality rates.

Taux de mortalité de la sclérose en plaques au Canada de 1975 à 2009. Contexte : Nous avons examiné la mortalité due à la sclérose en plaques (SP) au Canada entre 1975 et 2009 afin de déterminer s’il y a eu un changement quant à l’âge au décès par rapport à la population en général et une diminution des taux de mortalité due à la SP. Méthode : Les taux de mortalité due à la SP et toutes causes confondues par 100,000 de population ont été calculés d’après les données de Statistique Canada, standardisées pour l’âge de la population en 2006. Résultats : Au Canada, le taux annuel moyen de mortalité due à la SP de 1975 à 2009 était de 1,23/100,000 de population. Les taux quinquennaux de 1975-79, 1980-84, 1985-89, 1990-94, 1995-99, 2000-04 et 2005-09 étaient de 1,16, 0,94, 1,01, 1,16, 1,30, 1,43 et 1,33 respectivement. L’analyse de tendance a montré que les taux de mortalité pendant cette période de 35 ans étaient stables (pourcentage de changement annuel moyen de moins de 1%). Les taux annuels moyens de 1975 à 2009 pour les femmes et les hommes étaient de 1,45 et 0,99 respectivement. Les taux quinquennaux des femmes étaient toujours supérieurs à ceux des hommes. Sans égard au sexe, avec le temps nous avons noté une diminution dans les taux de mortalité due à la SP dans le groupe d’âge de 0 à 39 ans et une augmentation dans les groupes de 60 à 69 ans, 70 à 79 ans et 80 ans et plus. Par contre, il y a eu une diminution des taux de mortalité toutes causes confondues dans chacun des groupes d’âge. Les taux de mortalité due à la SP les plus élevés pour la période de 1975 à 2009 étaient invariablement dans les groupes de 50 à 59 ans et 60 à 69 ans chez les deux sexes alors que les taux de mortalité toutes causes confondues les plus élevés étaient dans le groupe d’âge de 80 ans et plus. Conclusions : Les changements par groupe d’âge des taux de mortalité due à la SP indiquent qu’il y a eu une évolution vers un âge plus avancé au décès, possiblement due à une amélioration des soins de santé. Cependant, les patients atteints de SP demeurent désavantagés par rapport à la population en général et les changements dans l’âge au décès ne sont pas reflétés par une diminution des taux de mortalité.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Sharon A. Warren, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, 3-48 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G4. Email: sharon.warren@ualberta.ca.

References

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