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Kindling, Unit Discharge Patterns and Neural Plasticity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2015

Ronald Racine
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario
Larry Tuff
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario
Josef Zaide
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario
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Summary:

Two approaches to the study of the kindling phenomenon were discussed: 1) an attempt to identify the pattern of neural activity required to produce the changes underlying kindling and 2) an investigation into the nature of those changes. Three experiments were reported that used the neocortical transcallosal system as a monosynaptic model system in which to study possible synaptic mechanisms of the kindling effect. Experiment I showed an increase in the transcallosal evoked potential following neocortical kindling. Experiment II showed an increase in the strength of the transcallosal evoked cell discharge following neocortical kindling. Experiment III reported the results of an histological examination of neocortical tissue in kindled and non-kindled animals using the Golgi-Cox technique. Spine density, spine dimension and branching were measured for pyramidal cell apical dendrites. No differences were found between primary and secondary (contralateral) foci or between kindled and non-kindled animals.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation 1975

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