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The Impact of a Concussion-U Educational Program on Knowledge of and Attitudes about Concussion

  • Matthew E. Eagles (a1), David J. Bradbury-Squires (a1), Maria F. Powell (a1), Justin R. Murphy (a1), Graeme D. Campbell (a1) and Falah B. Maroun (a1)...

Abstract

Background: The diagnosis of a sports-related concussion is often dependent on the athlete self-reporting their symptoms. It has been suggested that improving youth athlete knowledge and attitudes toward concussion may increase self-reporting behaviour. The objective of this study was to determine if a novel Concussion-U educational program improves knowledge of and attitudes about concussion among a cohort of elite male Bantam and Midget AAA hockey players. Methods: Fifty-seven male Bantam and Midget AAA-level hockey players (mean age=14.52±1.13 years) were recruited from the local community. Each participant completed a modified version of the Rosenbaum Concussion Knowledge and Attitudes Survey–Student Version immediately before and after a Concussion-U educational presentation. Follow-up sessions were arranged 4 to 6 months after the presentation, and assessed retention of knowledge and attitude changes. Results: Forty-three players completed all three surveys. Concussion knowledge and attitude scores significantly (p<0.01) increased from pre- to post-presentation by 12.79 and 8.41%, respectively. At long-term follow-up, knowledge levels remained significantly (p<0.01) higher than baseline by 8.49%. Mean attitude scores were also increased at follow-up; however, this increase was not statistically significant. Conclusions: A Concussion-U educational program led to an immediate improvement in concussion knowledge and attitudes among elite male Bantam and Midget AAA hockey players. Increased knowledge was maintained at long-term follow-up, but improved attitude was not. Future studies should investigate whether similar educational programs influence symptom reporting and concussion incidence. In addition, they should focus on how to maintain improved concussion attitudes.

L’impact d’un programme éducatif Concussion-U sur les connaissances et les attitudes concernant la commotion cérébrale. Contexte : Le diagnostic d’une commotion cérébrale subie dans le cadre d’activités sportives dépend souvent de l’autodéclaration des symptômes par l’athlète. D’aucuns suggèrent que le fait d’améliorer les connaissances et les attitudes des jeunes athlètes concernant la commotion cérébrale pourrait augmenter l’autodéclaration. Le but de cette étude était de déterminer si un nouveau programme éducatif, Concussion-U, améliore les connaissances et les attitudes concernant la commotion cérébrale chez une cohorte de joueurs de hockey élites masculins de niveau bantam et midget AAA. Méthodologie : Cinquante-sept joueurs de hockey masculins de niveau bantam et midget AAA (âge moyen 14,52±1,13 ans) ont été recrutés dans la population locale. Chaque participant a complété une version modifiée pour étudiant du questionnaire Rosenbaum Concussion Knowledge and Attitudes Survey, immédiatement avant et après une présentation du programme éducatif Concussion-U. Des séances de suivi ont été cédulées entre 4 et 6 mois après la présentation afin d’évaluer le maintien des connaissances et les changements d’attitudes. Résultats : Quarante-trois joueurs ont complété les trois questionnaires. Les scores concernant les connaissances et les attitudes sur la commotion cérébrale ont augmenté de façon significative (p<0,01) après la présentation par rapport à ceux notés avant la présentation, soit de 12,79 et 8,41% respectivement. Au moment du suivi à long terme, les niveaux de connaissances sont demeurés significativement (p<0,01) plus élevés que ceux notés initialement, soit de 8,49%. Les scores moyens concernant les attitudes étaient également augmentés au moment du suivi. Cependant, cette augmentation n’était pas significative au point de vue statistique. Conclusions : Un programme éducatif tel le programme Concussion-U a donné lieu à une amélioration immédiate des connaissances et des attitudes concernant la commotion cérébrale chez les joueurs de hockey élites masculins de niveau bantam et midget AAA. L’augmentation des connaissances était maintenue au moment du suivi à long terme mais l’amélioration des attitudes ne l’était pas. Des études ultérieures devraient examiner si des programmes éducatifs similaires influencent la déclaration des symptômes ainsi que l’incidence des commotions cérébrales et devraient cibler en particulier comment maintenir de meilleures attitudes concernant la commotion cérébrale.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Matt Eagles, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 300 Prince Phillip Drive, St. John’s, NL, Canada, A1B 3V6. Email: meagles@mun.ca.

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Keywords

The Impact of a Concussion-U Educational Program on Knowledge of and Attitudes about Concussion

  • Matthew E. Eagles (a1), David J. Bradbury-Squires (a1), Maria F. Powell (a1), Justin R. Murphy (a1), Graeme D. Campbell (a1) and Falah B. Maroun (a1)...

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