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Family Studies of Alzheimer's Dementia: Results and Prospects

  • Leonard L. Heston (a1) and Marcia L. Morris (a1)

Abstract:

Studies of families located through a proband with dementia of the Alzheimer type have demonstrated transmission of the disorder within families, probably through shared genes. Increasing closeness of genetic relationship and increasing severity of illness are both associated with increasing risk to relatives. Families a.t high risk are especially valuable for studies of the biology of dementing illness including, in particular, their molecular genetics. Associations at several levels between Down's syndrome and Alzheimer's dementia provide important clues for molecular hypotheses.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

References

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