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Contralesional Spasticity of Conjugate Gaze in Striatocapsular Infarction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 September 2014

Jin-Woo Park
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan
Jeong-Yoon Choi*
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan
Jin-Man Jung
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan
Do-Young Kwon
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan
Moon Ho Park
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan
Ji-Soo Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea
*
Department of Neurology, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, 516, Gojan-1-dong, Ansan-si, Gyeonggido, 425-707, Korea. Email: a-yeong@hanmail.net.
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A 44-year-old man developed sudden non-fluent aphasia and right hemiplegia due to left striatocapsular infarction (Figure). Neurologic examination revealed gaze deviation to the right with eyes closed, but not with eyes open (Video). There was no spontaneous or gaze-evoked nystagmus, even after elimination of visual fixation. Leftward pursuit was impaired in a craniotopic frame of reference, and horizontal saccades were hypometric in both directions. Head impulse test was normal in the horizontal plane and there were no visual field defects. The contralesional gaze deviation with eye closure persisted for ten days.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological 2014

References

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