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An International Needs Assessment of Caregivers for Frontotemporal Dementia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 February 2016

Tiffany W. Chow*
Affiliation:
Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario Division of Neurology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
Fabricio J. Pio
Affiliation:
Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
Kenneth Rockwood
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario DGI Clinical, Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
*
Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, 3560 Bathurst Street, 8th Floor Brain Health Complex, Toronto, Ontario, M6A 2E1, Canada
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Abstract:

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Objective:

To guide development of public awareness and caregiver support resources for frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes.

Methods:

We used an online survey to explore their needs. The survey was self-administered by self-identified, English-speaking caregivers for patients with FTD in several countries.

Results:

Of 79 caregiver respondents, approximately half were caring for patients with behavioural variant FTD or semantic dementia. The most common initial symptoms were Changes in Thinking and Judgment. Half of the respondents identified “failure to recognize the early stage of illness as a dementia” as the most troublesome aspect. Accordingly, over 40% of respondents had difficulty obtaining an accurate diagnosis for the patient. Caregivers prioritized family counseling and the public educational message that dementia can affect young people.

Conclusion:

The largest international survey of FTD caregivers to-date showed that support is needed for all family members adapting to the shock of early-onset dementia, and this may be most readily provided online.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation 2011

References

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