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Two non-consecutive 24 h recalls using EPIC-Soft software are sufficiently valid for comparing protein and potassium intake between five European centres – results from the European Food Consumption Validation (EFCOVAL) study

  • Sandra P. Crispim (a1), Jeanne H. M. de Vries (a1), Anouk Geelen (a1), Olga W. Souverein (a1), Paul J. M. Hulshof (a1), Lionel Lafay (a2), Anne-Sophie Rousseau (a3), Inger T. L. Lillegaard (a4), Lene F. Andersen (a4), Inge Huybrechts (a5) (a6), Willem De Keyzer (a5) (a7), Jiri Ruprich (a8), Marcela Dofkova (a8), Marga C. Ocke (a9), Evelien de Boer (a9), Nadia Slimani (a6) and Pieter van't Veer (a1)...

Abstract

The use of two non-consecutive 24 h recalls using EPIC-Soft for standardised dietary monitoring in European countries has previously been proposed in the European Food Consumption Survey Method consortium. Whether this methodology is sufficiently valid to assess nutrient intake in a comparable way, among populations with different food patterns in Europe, is the subject of study in the European Food Consumption Validation consortium. The objective of the study was to compare the validity of usual protein and K intake estimated from two non-consecutive standardised 24 h recalls using EPIC-Soft between five selected centres in Europe. A total of 600 adults, aged 45–65 years, were recruited in Belgium, the Czech Republic, France, The Netherlands and Norway. From each participant, two 24 h recalls and two 24 h urines were collected. The mean and distribution of usual protein and K intake, as well as the ranking of intake, were compared with protein and K excretions within and between centres. Underestimation of protein (range 2–13 %) and K (range 4–17 %) intake was seen in all centres, except in the Czech Republic. We found a fair agreement between prevalences estimated based on the intake and excretion data at the lower end of the usual intake distribution ( < 10 % difference), but larger differences at other points. Protein and K intake was moderately correlated with excretion within the centres (ranges = 0·39–0·67 and 0·37–0·69, respectively). These were comparable across centres. In conclusion, two standardised 24 h recalls (EPIC-Soft) appear to be sufficiently valid for assessing and comparing the mean and distribution of protein and K intake across five centres in Europe as well as for ranking individuals.

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      Two non-consecutive 24 h recalls using EPIC-Soft software are sufficiently valid for comparing protein and potassium intake between five European centres – results from the European Food Consumption Validation (EFCOVAL) study
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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: S. P. Crispim, fax +31 0317 482782, email sandra.crispim@wur.nl; sandracrispim@gmail.com

References

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