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Three-way assessment of long-chain n-3 PUFA nutrition: by questionnaire and matched blood and skin samples

  • Sarah C. Wallingford (a1), Suzanne M. Pilkington (a1), Karen A. Massey (a2), Naser M. I. Al-Aasswad (a2), Torukiri I. Ibiebele (a3), Maria Celia Hughes (a3), Susan Bennett (a1), Anna Nicolaou (a2), Lesley E. Rhodes (a1) and Adèle C. Green (a1) (a3)...

Abstract

The long-chain n-3 PUFA, EPA, is believed to be important for skin health, including roles in the modulation of inflammation and protection from photodamage. FFQ and blood levels are used as non-invasive proxies for assessing skin PUFA levels, but studies examining how well these proxies reflect target organ content are lacking. In seventy-eight healthy women (mean age 42·8, range 21–60 years) residing in Greater Manchester, we performed a quantitative analysis of long-chain n-3 PUFA nutrition estimated from a self-reported FFQ (n 75) and correlated this with n-3 PUFA concentrations in erythrocytes (n 72) and dermis (n 39). Linear associations between the three n-3 PUFA measurements were assessed by Spearman correlation coefficients and agreement between these measurements was estimated. Average total dietary content of the principal long-chain n-3 PUFA EPA and DHA was 171 (sd 168) and 236 (sd 248) mg/d, respectively. EPA showed significant correlations between FFQ assessments and both erythrocyte (r 0·57, P< 0·0001) and dermal (r 0·33, P= 0·05) levels, as well as between erythrocytes and dermis (r 0·45, P= 0·008). FFQ intake of DHA and the sum of n-3 PUFA also correlated well with erythrocyte concentrations (r 0·50, P< 0·0001; r 0·27, P= 0·03). Agreement between ranked thirds of dietary intake, blood and dermis approached 50 % for EPA and DHA, though gross misclassification was lower for EPA. Thus, FFQ estimates and circulating levels of the dietary long-chain n-3 PUFA, EPA, may be utilised as well-correlated measures of its dermal bioavailability.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: S. C. Wallingford, fax +44 161 275 5348, E-mail: sarah.wallingford@manchester.ac.uk

References

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Keywords

Three-way assessment of long-chain n-3 PUFA nutrition: by questionnaire and matched blood and skin samples

  • Sarah C. Wallingford (a1), Suzanne M. Pilkington (a1), Karen A. Massey (a2), Naser M. I. Al-Aasswad (a2), Torukiri I. Ibiebele (a3), Maria Celia Hughes (a3), Susan Bennett (a1), Anna Nicolaou (a2), Lesley E. Rhodes (a1) and Adèle C. Green (a1) (a3)...

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