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Supplemental epilactose prevents metabolic disorders through uncoupling protein-1 induction in the skeletal muscle of mice fed high-fat diets

  • Yuki Murakami (a1), Teruyo Ojima-Kato (a2), Wataru Saburi (a3), Haruhide Mori (a3), Hirokazu Matsui (a3), Soichi Tanabe (a1) and Takuya Suzuki (a1)...

Abstract

Obesity is one of the major health problems throughout the world. The present study investigated the preventive effect of epilactose – a rare non-digestible disaccharide – on obesity and metabolic disorders in mice fed high-fat (HF) diets. Feeding with HF diets increased body weight gain, fat pad weight and adipocyte size in mice (P<0·01), and these increases were effectively prevented by the use of supplemental epilactose without influencing food intake (P<0·01). Caecal pools of SCFA such as acetic and propionic acids in mice fed epilactose were higher compared with mice not receiving epilactose. Supplemental epilactose increased the expression of uncoupling protein (UCP)-1, which enhances energy expenditure, to 2-fold in the gastrocnemius muscle (P=0·04) and to 1·3-fold in the brown adipose tissue (P=0·02) in mice fed HF diets. Feeding HF diets induced pro-inflammatory macrophage infiltration into white adipose tissue, as indicated by the increased expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, TNF-α and F4/80, and these increases were attenuated by supplemental epilactose. In differentiated myogenic-like C2C12 cells, propionic acid, but not acetic or n-butyric acids, directly enhanced UCP-1 expression by approximately 2-fold (P<0·01). Taken together, these findings indicate that the epilactose-mediated increase in UCP-1 in the skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue can enhance whole-body energy expenditure, leading to effective prevention of obesity and metabolic disorders in mice fed HF diets. It is suggested that propionic acid – a bacterial metabolite – acts as a mediator to induce UCP-1 expression in skeletal muscles.

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      Supplemental epilactose prevents metabolic disorders through uncoupling protein-1 induction in the skeletal muscle of mice fed high-fat diets
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Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: T. Suzuki, fax +81 82 424 7916, email takuya@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

References

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Supplemental epilactose prevents metabolic disorders through uncoupling protein-1 induction in the skeletal muscle of mice fed high-fat diets

  • Yuki Murakami (a1), Teruyo Ojima-Kato (a2), Wataru Saburi (a3), Haruhide Mori (a3), Hirokazu Matsui (a3), Soichi Tanabe (a1) and Takuya Suzuki (a1)...

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