Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Study of the effect exerted by fructo-oligosaccharides from yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) root flour in an intestinal infection model with Salmonella Typhimurium

  • Eva Velez (a1) (a2), Natalia Castillo (a2), Oscar Mesón (a1), Alfredo Grau (a3), María E. Bibas Bonet (a1) and Gabriela Perdigón (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

Beneficial effects of prebiotics like inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) have been proven in health and nutrition. Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius), an Andean crop, contains FOS (50–70 % of its dry weight) and, therefore, is considered a prebiotic. Commercial FOS can up-regulate total secretory IgA (S-IgA) in infant mice, prevent infection with Salmonella in swine or enhance immune response for Salmonella vaccine in a mouse model. Previously, we found that administration of yacon root flour regulates gut microbiota balance and has immunomodulatory effects without inflammatory responses. The aim of the present paper is to analyse if yacon prevents enteric infection caused by a strain of Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in a mouse model. BALB/c mice were supplemented with yacon flour (45 d), challenged with S. Typhimurium and killed to study pathogen translocation, total and specific IgA production by ELISA, presence of IgA and other cytokines and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and clustor of differentiation 206 (CD206) receptors positive cells by immunofluorescence and histological changes. Yacon flour administration had a protective effect from 15 to 30 d of treatment. We found a peak of total S-IgA production without translocation of the pathogen for these periods. At 30 d, there was an increase in IL-6 and macrophage inflammatory proteins-1α+ cells and expression of the receptors CD206 and TLR4. Yacon flour did not have incidence in pathogen-specific S-IgA production. Longer periods (45 d) of administration had no protective effect. Therefore, yacon can prevent enteric infection caused by S. Typhimurium when given up to 30 d; this effect would be mediated by enhancing non-specific immunity, such as total S-IgA, that improves the immunological intestinal barrier.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Study of the effect exerted by fructo-oligosaccharides from yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) root flour in an intestinal infection model with Salmonella Typhimurium
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Study of the effect exerted by fructo-oligosaccharides from yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) root flour in an intestinal infection model with Salmonella Typhimurium
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Study of the effect exerted by fructo-oligosaccharides from yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) root flour in an intestinal infection model with Salmonella Typhimurium
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: G. Perdigón, fax +54 381 4005600, email perdigon@cerela.org.ar

References

Hide All
1Burkitt, DP & Trowell, HC (1975) Refined Carbohydrate and Disease. New York, NY: Academic Press.
2Gibson, GR & Roberfroid, MB (1995) Dietary modulation of the human colonic microbiota: introducing the concept of prebiotics. J Nutr 125, 14011412.
3Macfarlane, SMGT & Cummings, JH (2006) Review article: prebiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 24, 701714.
4Kelly, G (2009) Inulin-type prebiotics: a review (part 2). Altern Med Rev 14, 3655.
5Kleessen, B, Hartmann, L & Blaut, M (2001) Oligofructose and long-chain inulin: influence on the gut microbial ecology of rats associated with a human faecal flora. Br J Nutr 86, 291300.
6Voragen, AGJ (1998) Technological aspects of functional food-related carbohydrates. Trends Food Sci Technol 9, 328335.
7Denipote, FG, Trindade, EB & Burini, RC (2010) Probiotics and prebiotics in primary care for colon cancer. Arq Gastroenterol 47, 9398.
8Scholz-Ahrens, KE, Ade, P, Marten, B, et al. (2007) Prebiotics, probiotics, and synbiotics affect mineral absorption, bone mineral content, and bone structure. J Nutr 137, 838S846S.
9Boyle, FG, Wrenn, JM, Marsh, BB, et al. (2008) Safety evaluation of oligofructose: 13 week rat study and in vitro mutagenicity. Food Chem Toxicol 46, 31323139.
10Williams, CM (1999) Effects of inulin on lipid parameters in humans. J Nutr 129, 1471S1473S.
11Lomax, AR & Calder, PC (2009) Prebiotics, immune function, infection and inflammation: a review of the evidence. Br J Nutr 101, 633658.
12Van Loo, J, Cummings, J, Delzenne, N, et al. (1999) Functional food properties of non-digestible oligosaccharides: a consensus report from the ENDO project (DGXII AIRII-CT94-1095). Br J Nutr 81, 121132.
13Macfarlane, GT & Cummings, JH (1999) Probiotics and prebiotics: can regulating the activities of intestinal bacteria benefit health? BMJ 318, 9991003.
14Kaur, N & Gupta, AK (2002) Applications of inulin and oligofructose in health and nutrition. J Biosci 27, 703714.
15Roberfroid, MB (2000) Prebiotics and probiotics: are they functional foods? Am J Clin Nutr 71, 1682S1687S(discussion 1688S–1690S).
16Grau, A & Rea, J (1997) Yacon. Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. & Endl.) H. Robinson. In Andean Roots and Tubers: Ahipa, Arracacha, Maca and Yacon, chapter 5, pp. 199242 [M, Hermann and J, Heller, editors]. Rome: International Plant Genetic Resources Institute.
17Valentova, K, Lebeda, A, Dolezalova, I, et al. (2006) The biological and chemical variability of yacon. J Agric Food Chem 54, 13471352.
18Graefe, S, Hermann, M, Manrique, I, et al. (2004) Effects of post-harvest treatments on the carbohydrate composition of yacon roots in the Peruvian Andes. Field Crops Res 86, 157165.
19Valentova, K & Ulrichova, J (2003) Smallanthus sonchifolius and Lepidium meyenii – prospective Andean crops for the prevention of chronic diseases. Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub 147, 119130.
20Aybar, MJ, Sanchez Riera, AN, Grau, A, et al. (2001) Hypoglycemic effect of the water extract of Smallantus sonchifolius (yacon) leaves in normal and diabetic rats. J Ethnopharmacol 74, 125132.
21Valentova, K, Cvak, L, Muck, A, et al. (2003) Antioxidant activity of extracts from the leaves of Smallanthus sonchifolius. Eur J Nutr 42, 6166.
22Inoue, A, Tamogami, S, Kato, H, et al. (1995) Antifungal melampolides from leaf extracts of Smallanthus sonchifolius. Phytochemistry 39, 845848.
23Valentova, K, Stejskal, D, Bartek, J, et al. (2008) Maca (Lepidium meyenii) and yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) in combination with silymarin as food supplements: in vivo safety assessment. Food Chem Toxicol 46, 10061013.
24Geyer, M, Manrique, I, Degen, L, et al. (2008) Effect of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) on colonic transit time in healthy volunteers. Digestion 78, 3033.
25Genta, SB, Cabrera, WM, Grau, A, et al. (2005) Subchronic 4-month oral toxicity study of dried Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon) roots as a diet supplement in rats. Food Chem Toxicol 43, 16571665.
26Nakamura, Y, Nosaka, S, Suzuki, M, et al. (2004) Dietary fructooligosaccharides up-regulate immunoglobulin A response and polymeric immunoglobulin receptor expression in intestines of infant mice. Clin Exp Immunol 137, 5258.
27Letellier, A, Messier, S, Lessard, L, et al. (2000) Assessment of various treatments to reduce carriage of Salmonella in swine. Can J Vet Res 64, 2731.
28Benyacoub, J, Rochat, F, Saudan, KY, et al. (2008) Feeding a diet containing a fructooligosaccharide mix can enhance Salmonella vaccine efficacy in mice. J Nutr 138, 123129.
29Rishi, P, Mavi, SK, Bharrhan, S, et al. (2009) Protective efficacy of probiotic alone or in conjunction with a prebiotic in Salmonella-induced liver damage. FEMS Microbiol Ecol 69, 222230.
30Bibas Bonet, ME, de Moreno de LeBlanc, A, Dogi, A, et al. (2010) Prebiotic effect of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) on intestinal mucosa using a mouse model. Food Agric Immunol 21, 175189.
31Mastroeni, P & Sheppard, M (2004) Salmonella infections in the mouse model: host resistance factors and in vivo dynamics of bacterial spread and distribution in the tissues. Microbes Infect 6, 398405.
32Tsolis, RM, Kingsley, RA, Townsend, SM, et al. (1999) Of mice, calves, and men. Comparison of the mouse typhoid model with other Salmonella infections. Adv Exp Med Biol 473, 261274.
33Kaufmann, SH, Raupach, B & Finlay, BB (2001) Introduction: microbiology and immunology: lessons learned from Salmonella. Microbes Infect 3, 11771181.
34Santander, J & Curtiss, R 3rd (2010) Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A are avirulent in newborn and infant mice even when expressing virulence plasmid genes of Salmonella Typhimurium. J Infect Dev Ctries 4, 723731.
35de Moreno de LeBlanc, A, Castillo, NA & Perdigon, G (2010) Anti-infective mechanisms induced by a probiotic Lactobacillus strain against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. Int J Food Microbiol 138, 223231.
36de Moreno de LeBlanc, A, Dogi, CA, Galdeano, CM, et al. (2008) Effect of the administration of a fermented milk containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 on intestinal microbiota and gut associated immune cells of nursing mice and after weaning until immune maturity. BMC Immunol 9, 27.
37Sainte-Marie, G (1961) A paraffin embedding technique for studies employing immunofluorescence. J Histochem Cytochem 250256.
38Galdeano, CM & Perdigon, G (2006) The probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus casei induces activation of the gut mucosal immune system through innate immunity. Clin Vaccine Immunol 13, 219226.
39Lamm, ME, Nedrug, JG, Kaetzel, CS, et al. (1996) New insight into epithelial cell function in mucosal immunity: neutralization of intracellular pathogens and excretion of antigens by IgA. In Essentials of Mucosal Immunology, chapter 12, pp. 141150 [Kagnoff, M and Kiyono, H, editors]. San Diego: Academic Press.
40Stober, D, Schirmbeck, R & Reimann, J (2001) IL-12/IL-18-dependent IFN-gamma release by murine dendritic cells. J Immunol 167, 957965.

Keywords

Study of the effect exerted by fructo-oligosaccharides from yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) root flour in an intestinal infection model with Salmonella Typhimurium

  • Eva Velez (a1) (a2), Natalia Castillo (a2), Oscar Mesón (a1), Alfredo Grau (a3), María E. Bibas Bonet (a1) and Gabriela Perdigón (a1) (a2)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed