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Ruminal biohydrogenation as affected by tannins in vitro

  • Valentina Vasta (a1) (a2), Harinder P. S. Makkar (a3), Marcello Mele (a4) and Alessandro Priolo (a1)

Abstract

The aim of the present work was to study the effects of tannins from carob (CT; Ceratonia siliqua), acacia leaves (AT; Acacia cyanophylla) and quebracho (QT; Schinopsis lorentzii) on ruminal biohydrogenation in vitro. The tannins extracted from CT, AT and QT were incubated for 12 h in glass syringes in cow buffered ruminal fluid (BRF) with hay or hay plus concentrate as a substrate. Within each feed, three concentrations of tannins were used (0·0, 0·6 and 1·0 mg/ml BRF). The branched-chain volatile fatty acids, the branched-chain fatty acids and the microbial protein concentration were reduced (P < 0·05) by tannins. In the tannin-containing fermenters, vaccenic acid was accumulated (+23 %, P < 0·01) while stearic acid was reduced ( − 16 %, P < 0·0005). The concentration of total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers in the BRF was not affected by tannins. The assay on linoleic acid isomerase (LA-I) showed that the enzyme activity (nmol CLA produced/min per mg protein) was unaffected by the inclusion of tannins in the fermenters. However, the CLA produced by LA-I (nmol/ml per min) was lower in the presence of tannins. These results suggest that tannins reduce ruminal biohydrogenation through the inhibition of the activity of ruminal micro-organisms.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Valentina Vasta, fax +39 095 234345, email vvasta@unict.it

References

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Ruminal biohydrogenation as affected by tannins in vitro

  • Valentina Vasta (a1) (a2), Harinder P. S. Makkar (a3), Marcello Mele (a4) and Alessandro Priolo (a1)

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