Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Reproductive state and choline intake influence enrichment of plasma lysophosphatidylcholine-DHA: a post-hoc analysis of a controlled feeding trial

  • Kevin C. Klatt (a1) (a2), Melissa Q McDougall (a1), Olga V. Malysheva (a1), J. Thomas Brenna (a1) (a3), Mark S. Roberson (a1) and Marie A. Caudill (a1)...

Abstract

The major facilitator superfamily domain 2a protein was identified recently as a lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) symporter with high affinity for LPC species enriched with DHA (LPC-DHA). To test the hypothesis that reproductive state and choline intake influence plasma LPC-DHA, we performed a post-hoc analysis of samples available through 10 weeks of a previously conducted feeding study, which provided two doses of choline (480 and 930 mg/d) to non-pregnant (n=21), third-trimester pregnant (n=26), and lactating (n=24) women; all participants consumed 200 mg of supplemental DHA and 22% of their daily choline intake as deuterium-labeled choline. The effects of reproductive state and choline intake on total LPC-DHA (expressed as a percentage of LPC) and plasma enrichments of labeled LPC and LPC-DHA were assessed using mixed and generalized linear models. Reproductive state interacted with time (p=0.001) to influence total LPC-DHA, which significantly increased by week 10 in non-pregnant women, but not in pregnant or lactating women. Contrary to total LPC-DHA, patterns of labeled LPC-DHA enrichments were discordant between pregnant and lactating women (p<0.05), suggestive of unique, reproductive state-specific mechanisms that result in the reduced production and/or enhanced clearance of LPC-DHA during pregnancy and lactation. Regardless of reproductive state, women consuming 930 versus 480 mg choline/d exhibited no change in total LPC-DHA but higher d3-LPC-DHA (p=0.02), indicating that higher choline intakes favor production of LPC-DHA from the PEMT pathway of phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Our results warrant further investigation into the effect of reproductive state and dietary choline on LPC-DHA dynamics and its contribution to DHA status.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Reproductive state and choline intake influence enrichment of plasma lysophosphatidylcholine-DHA: a post-hoc analysis of a controlled feeding trial
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Reproductive state and choline intake influence enrichment of plasma lysophosphatidylcholine-DHA: a post-hoc analysis of a controlled feeding trial
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Reproductive state and choline intake influence enrichment of plasma lysophosphatidylcholine-DHA: a post-hoc analysis of a controlled feeding trial
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Address correspondence to: Marie A. Caudill, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, 228 Savage Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853. E-mail: mac379@cornell.edu Telephone: 607-254-7456

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed