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No energy compensation at the meal following exercise indietary restrained and unrestrained women

  • Anne Lluch (a1), Neil A. King (a1) and John E. Blundell (a1)

Abstract

The objective of this investigation was to compare the acute effects of exercise and diet manipulations on energy intake, between dietary restrained and unrestrained females. Comparisons of two studies using an identical 2 × 2 repeated-measures design (level of activity (rest or exercise) and lunch type (high-fat or low-fat)) including thirteen dietary unrestrained and twelve restrained females were performed. Energy expenditure during the rest session was estimated and the energy cost of exercise was measured by indirect calorimetry. Relative energy intake was calculated by subtracting the energy expenditure of the exercise session from the energy intake of the test meal. Post-meal hedonic ratings were completed after lunch. Energy intake and relative energy intake increased during high-fat conditions compared with the low-fat, independently of exercise (P < 0·001). There was a positive relationship between dietary restraint scores and energy intake or relative energy intake in the rest conditions only (r 0·54, P < 0·01). The decrease of relative energy intake between the rest and exercise conditions was higher in restrained than in unrestrained eaters (P < 0·01). These results confirm that a high-fat diet reversed the energy deficit due to exercise. There was no energy compensation in response to an acute bout of exercise during the following meal. In restrained eaters, exercise was more effective in creating an energy deficit than in unrestrained eaters. Exercise may help restrained eaters to maintain control over appetite.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr Anne Lluch, fax +44 (0) 113 233 57 49, email Annel@psychology.leeds.ac.uk

References

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Keywords

No energy compensation at the meal following exercise indietary restrained and unrestrained women

  • Anne Lluch (a1), Neil A. King (a1) and John E. Blundell (a1)

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