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Lactose malabsorption and colonic fermentations alter host metabolism in rats

  • Virginie Alexandre (a1) (a2), Patrick C. Even (a1), Christiane Larue-Achagiotis (a1), Jean-Marc Blouin (a1), François Blachier (a1), Robert Benamouzig (a3), Daniel Tomé (a1) and Anne-Marie Davila (a1)...

Abstract

Lactose malabsorption is associated with rapid production of high levels of osmotic compounds, such as organic acids and SCFA in the colon, suspected to contribute to the onset of lactose intolerance. Adult rats are lactase deficient and the present study was conducted to evaluate in vivo the metabolic consequences of acute lactose ingestion, including host–microbiota interactions. Rats received diets of 25 % sucrose (S25 control group) or 25 % lactose (L25 experimental group). SCFA and lactic acid were quantified in intestinal contents and portal blood. Expression of SCFA transporter genes was quantified in the colonic mucosa. Carbohydrate oxidation (Cox) and lipid oxidation (Lox) were computed by indirect calorimetry. Measurements were performed over a maximum of 13 h. Time, diet and time × diet variables had significant effects on SCFA concentration in the caecum (P< 0·001, P= 0·004 and P= 0·007, respectively) and the portal blood (P< 0·001, P= 0·04 and P< 0·001, respectively). Concomitantly, expression of sodium monocarboxylate significantly increased in the colonic mucosa of the L25 group (P= 0·003 at t= 6 h and P< 0·05 at t= 8 h). During 5 h after the meal, the L25 group's changes in metabolic parameters (Cox, Lox) were significantly lower than those of the S25 group (P= 0·02). However, after 5 h, L25 Cox became greater than S25 (P= 0·004). Thus, enhanced production and absorption of SCFA support the metabolic changes observed in calorimetry. These results underline the consequences of acute lactose malabsorption and measured compensations occurring in the host's metabolism, presumably through the microbiota fermentations and microbiota–host interactions.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr A.-M. Davila, fax +33 1 44 08 18 58, email davila@agroparistech.fr

References

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Lactose malabsorption and colonic fermentations alter host metabolism in rats

  • Virginie Alexandre (a1) (a2), Patrick C. Even (a1), Christiane Larue-Achagiotis (a1), Jean-Marc Blouin (a1), François Blachier (a1), Robert Benamouzig (a3), Daniel Tomé (a1) and Anne-Marie Davila (a1)...

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