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Iron absorption from rice meals cooked with fortified salt containing ferrous sulphate and ascorbic acid

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

M. H. Sayers
Affiliation:
South African MRC Iron and Red Cell Metabolism Unit, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
S. R. Lynch
Affiliation:
South African MRC Iron and Red Cell Metabolism Unit, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
R. W. Charlton
Affiliation:
South African MRC Iron and Red Cell Metabolism Unit, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
T. H. Bothwell
Affiliation:
South African MRC Iron and Red Cell Metabolism Unit, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
R. B. Walker
Affiliation:
Department of Botany, University of Washington, SeattleUSA
Fatima Mayet
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, University of Natal, Durban, South Africa
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Abstract

1. Iron absorption from rice-containing meals was measured by red cell utilization of radioactive Fe in sixty-six volunteer multiparous Indian women.

2. In all the studies salt added during the cooking process was used as the carrier for supplemental inorganic Fe and ascorbic acid.

3. Intrinsic Fe in the rice and supplementary inorganic Fe were absorbed to the same extent, with a wide range of absorption values.

4. There was a striking difference between the mean absorption of a 3 mg dose of ferrous Fe given to fasting subjects in a solution containing 30 mg ascorbic acid and that of Fe in a rice meal (48.7 and 3.5% respectively).

5. When ascorbic acid was added during cooking there was a threefold increase in the absorption of both intrinsic Fe and supplementary Fe when a sufficient quantity (60 mg) was present.

6. It is concluded that the Fe nutrition of rice-eating communities could be improved significantly by the addition of ascorbic acid to the diet.

Type
Clinical and Human Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1974

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