Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Food balance sheet and household budget survey dietary data and mortality patterns in Europe

  • Androniki Naska (a1), Mari-Anna Berg (a2), Carmen Cuadrado (a3), Heinz Freisling (a4), Kurt Gedrich (a5), Matej Gregorič (a6), Cecily Kelleher (a7), Emilia Leskova (a8), Michael Nelson (a9), Lucienne Pace (a10), Anne-Marie Remaut (a11), Sara Rodrigues (a12), Wlodzimierz Sekula (a13), Michael Sjöstrom (a14), Kerstin Trygg (a15), Aida Turrini (a16), Jean Luc Volatier (a17), Gabor Zajkas (a18) and Antonia Trichopoulou (a1) (a19)...

Abstract

Worldwide dietary data for nutrition monitoring and surveillance are commonly derived from food balance sheets (FBS) and household budget surveys (HBS). We have compared food supply from FBS and food availability data from HBS among eighteen European countries and have estimated the extent to which they correlate, focusing on food groups which are comparably captured by FBS and HBS and for which there is epidemiological evidence that they can have a noticeable impact on population mortality. Spearman's correlation coefficient was +0·78 (P < 10− 3) for vegetables (including legumes),+0·76 (P < 10− 3) for fruits, +0·69 (P < 10− 3) for fish and seafood and +0·93 (P < 10− 3) for olive oil. With respect to meat and meat products, the coefficient was lower at +0·39 (P = 0·08). Moreover, we have examined whether the supply (FBS) or the availability (HBS) of food groups known or presumed to have beneficial effect on the occurrence of CHD and total cancer can predict overall, coronary and cancer mortality in ecological analyses. After controlling for purchasing power parity-adjusted gross domestic product and tobacco smoking we found that for vegetables, fruits, fish and seafood, as well as for olive oil, both the FBS and the HBS estimates were inversely associated with all three indicators of mortality, although the number of countries with complete information on all study variables hindered formal statistical documentation (P>0·05 in some instances). FBS and HBS have their own strengths and weaknesses, but they may complement each other in dietary assessments at the population level.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Food balance sheet and household budget survey dietary data and mortality patterns in Europe
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Food balance sheet and household budget survey dietary data and mortality patterns in Europe
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Food balance sheet and household budget survey dietary data and mortality patterns in Europe
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr Antonia Trichopoulou, fax +30 210 746 2079, email antonia@nut.uoa.gr

References

Hide All
1Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (2007) Workshop on supply utilisation accounts and food balance sheets. Food Balance Sheets: History, Sources, Concepts and Definitions. http://www.foodsec.org/tr/stat/tr_taj_02_fbs.pdf (accessed 21 February 2008)..
2Trichopoulou, A (1992) Monitoring food intake in Europe: a food data bank based on household budget surveys. Eur J Clin Nutr 46, Suppl. 5, S3S8.
3US Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008) N H A N E S – National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey home page. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm (accessed 21 February 2008)..
4Hoare, J, Henderson, L, Bates, CJ, et al. (2004) The National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Adults Aged 19 to 64 Years, vol. 5: summary report. London: The Stationery Office.
5Ocké, MC, Hulshof, KFAM & van Rossum, CTM (2005) The Dutch national food consumption survey 2003. Methodological issues. Arch Public Health 63, 227241.
6Elmadfa, I (2003) Austrian Nutrition Report 2003. English Summary. Vienna: Federal Ministry of Health and Women.
7Armstrong, B & Doll, R (1975) Environmental factors and cancer incidence and mortality in different countries, with special reference to dietary practices. Int J Cancer 15, 617631.
8Carroll, KK, Braden, LM, Bell, JA, et al. (1986) Fat and cancer. Cancer 58, Suppl. 8, 18181825.
9Serra-Majem, L, La Vecchia, C, Ribas-Barba, L, et al. (1993) Changes in diet and mortality from selected cancers in southern Mediterranean countries, 1960–1989. Eur J Clin Nutr 47, Suppl. 1, S25S34.
10Trichopoulos, D & Lagiou, P (2004) Mediterranean diet and overall mortality differences in the European Union. Public Health Nutr 7, 949951.
11Prieto-Ramos, F, Serra-Majem, L, La Vecchia, C, et al. (1996) Mortality trends and past and current dietary factors of breast cancer in Spain. Eur J Epidemiol 12, 141148.
12Trichopoulou, A, Naska, A, Costacou, T, et al. (2002) Disparities in food habits across Europe. Proc Nutr Soc 61, 553558.
13Naska, A, Fouskakis, D, Oikonomou, E, et al. (2006) Dietary patterns and their socio-demographic determinants in ten European countries. Data from the DAFNE databank. Eur J Clin Nutr 60, 181190.
14Lagiou, P, Trichopoulou, A, Henderickx, HK, et al. (1999) Household budget survey nutritional data in relation to mortality from coronary heart disease, colorectal cancer and female breast cancer in European countries. DAFNE I and II projects of the European Commission. Data Food Networking. Eur J Clin Nutr 53, 328332.
15Rodrigues, SSP, Trichopoulou, A & de Almeida, MDV (2008) Household diet quality in relation to mortality in Portuguese regions: an ecological study. J Public Health 16, 4351.
16Trichopoulou, A, Naska, A & Oikonomou, E (2005) The DAFNE databank: the past and the future of monitoring the dietary habits of Europeans. J Public Health 13, 6973.
17Lagiou, P & Trichopoulou, A (2001) DAFNE contributors. DAta Food NEtworking The DAFNE initiative: the methodology for assessing dietary patterns across Europe using household budget survey data. Public Health Nutr 4, 11351141.
18Willett, WC (1998) Nutritional Epidemiology, 2nd ed.New York: Oxford University Press.
19World Cancer Research Fund & American Institute for Cancer Research (2007) Food, Nutrition and Physical Activity, and the Prevention of Cancer: a Global Perspective. Washington, DC: American Institute for Cancer Research.
20Benetou, V, Orfanos, P, Lagiou, P, et al. (2008) Vegetables and fruits in relation to cancer risk: evidence from the Greek EPIC cohort study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 17, 387392.
21Altman, GD (1991) Practical Statistics for Medical Research. London: Chapman and Hall.
22Rodrigues, SSP, Lopes, C, Naska, A, et al. (2007) Comparison of national food supply, household food availability and individual food consumption data in Portugal. J Public Health 15, 447455.
23Marshall, J (1989) The use of multiple reports in epidemiological studies. Stat Med 8, 10411050.
24Trichopoulou, A (1995) Olive oil and breast cancer. Cancer Causes Control 6, 475476.
25Braga, C, La Vecchia, C, Franceschi, S, et al. (1998) Olive oil, other seasoning fats, and the risk of colorectal carcinoma. Cancer 82, 448453.
26Trichopoulou, A, Costacou, T, Bamia, C, et al. (2003) Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and survival in a Greek population. N Engl J Med 348, 25992608.
27Naska, A, Vasdekis, VG & Trichopoulou, A (2001) A preliminary assessment of the use of household budget survey data for the prediction of individual food consumption. Public Health Nutr 4, 11591165.
28Vasdekis, VG, Stylianou, S & Naska, A (2001) Estimation of age and gender-specific food availability from household budget survey data. Public Health Nutr 4, 11491151.
29European Commission Directorate General for Health and Consumers (2003) Network for the Pan-European Food Data Bank based on Household Budget Surveys. The DAFNE III project. http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_projects/1999/monitoring/monitoring_project_1999_full_en.htm#1 (accessed 21 February 2008)..
30European Commission Directorate General for Health and Consumers (2005) Network for the Pan-European Food Data Bank based on Household Budget Surveys. The DAFNE IV project. http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_projects/2002/monitoring/monitoring_2002_04_en.htm (accessed 21 February 2008)..
31Naska, A, Vasdekis, VG, Trichopoulou, A, et al. (2000) Fruit and vegetable availability among ten European countries: how does it compare with the ‘five-a-day’ recommendation? Br J Nutr 84, 549556.
32Morgenstern, H (1982) Uses of ecologic analysis in epidemiologic research. Am J Public Health 72, 13361344.
33Murray, CJ & Lopez, AD (1997) Mortality by cause for eight regions of the world: Global Burden of Disease Study. Lancet 349, 12691276.
34Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (2008) FAOSTAT. http://faostat.fao.org/site/291/default.aspx (accessed 21 February 2008)..

Keywords

Food balance sheet and household budget survey dietary data and mortality patterns in Europe

  • Androniki Naska (a1), Mari-Anna Berg (a2), Carmen Cuadrado (a3), Heinz Freisling (a4), Kurt Gedrich (a5), Matej Gregorič (a6), Cecily Kelleher (a7), Emilia Leskova (a8), Michael Nelson (a9), Lucienne Pace (a10), Anne-Marie Remaut (a11), Sara Rodrigues (a12), Wlodzimierz Sekula (a13), Michael Sjöstrom (a14), Kerstin Trygg (a15), Aida Turrini (a16), Jean Luc Volatier (a17), Gabor Zajkas (a18) and Antonia Trichopoulou (a1) (a19)...

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed