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Epigallocatechin gallate changes mRNA expression level of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism in hepatocytes

  • Tsuyoshi Goto (a1), Yuuki Saito (a1), Kensei Morikawa (a1), Yoshihiro Kanamaru (a1) and Satoshi Nagaoka (a1)...

Abstract

Catechins, compounds derived from green tea, have been shown to improve cholesterol metabolism in animal studies, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully understood. We performed DNA microarray analysis in order to clarify the effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the dominant catechin in green tea, on cholesterol metabolism in HepG2 hepatocytes. This revealed that the expression levels of several genes related to cholesterol metabolism, including the LDL receptor, were changed by EGCG treatment. Using a real-time PCR technique, we confirmed that EGCG treatment up-regulated mRNA expression level of the LDL receptor. Moreover, EGCG decreased extracellular apoB levels. These findings indicated that EGCG improves cholesterol metabolism through the up-regulation of LDL receptor and also reduces extracellular apoB levels.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Professor S. Nagaoka, fax +81 58 293 2931, email nagaoka@gifu-u.ac.jp

References

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