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Effects of two commercially available feline diets on glucose and insulin concentrations, insulin sensitivity and energetic efficiency of weight gain

  • M. Coradini (a1), J. S. Rand (a1), J. M. Morton (a1) and J. M. Rawlings (a2)

Abstract

A low-carbohydrate, high-protein (LCHP) diet is often recommended for the prevention and management of diabetes in cats; however, the effect of macronutrient composition on insulin sensitivity and energetic efficiency for weight gain is not known. The present study compared the effect in adult cats (n 32) of feeding a LCHP (23 and 47 % metabolisable energy (ME)) and a high-carbohydrate, low-protein (HCLP) diet (51 and 21 % ME) on fasting and postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations, and on insulin sensitivity. Tests were done in the 4th week of maintenance feeding and after 8 weeks of ad libitum feeding, when weight gain and energetic efficiency of each diet were also measured. When fed at maintenance energy, the HCLP diet resulted in higher postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations. When fed ad libitum, the LCHP diet resulted in greater weight gain (P < 0·01), and was associated with higher energetic efficiency. Overweight cats eating the LCHP diet had similar postprandial glucose concentrations to lean cats eating the HCLP diet. Insulin sensitivity was not different between the diets when cats were lean or overweight, but glucose effectiveness was higher after weight gain in cats fed the HCLP diet. According to the present results, LCHP diets fed at maintenance requirements might benefit cats with multiple risk factors for developing diabetes. However, ad libitum feeding of LCHP diets is not recommended as they have higher energetic efficiency and result in greater weight gain.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: M. Coradini, fax +61 7 3346 9822, email m.coradini@uq.edu.au

References

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Keywords

Effects of two commercially available feline diets on glucose and insulin concentrations, insulin sensitivity and energetic efficiency of weight gain

  • M. Coradini (a1), J. S. Rand (a1), J. M. Morton (a1) and J. M. Rawlings (a2)

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