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The effect of long-term calcium supplementation on indices of iron, zinc and magnesium status in lactating Gambian women

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Liya Yan
Affiliation:
Medical Research Council Dunn Nutrition Unit, Downhams Lane, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 1XJ and Keneba, PO Box 273, The Gambia
Ann Prentice
Affiliation:
Medical Research Council Dunn Nutrition Unit, Downhams Lane, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 1XJ and Keneba, PO Box 273, The Gambia
Bakary Dibba
Affiliation:
Medical Research Council Dunn Nutrition Unit, Downhams Lane, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 1XJ and Keneba, PO Box 273, The Gambia
Landing M. A. Jarjou
Affiliation:
Medical Research Council Dunn Nutrition Unit, Downhams Lane, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 1XJ and Keneba, PO Box 273, The Gambia
Dorothy M. Stirling
Affiliation:
Medical Research Council Dunn Nutrition Unit, Downhams Lane, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 1XJ and Keneba, PO Box 273, The Gambia
Susan Fairweather-Tait
Affiliation:
Institute of Food Research, Norwich Laboratory, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA
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Abstract

The effect of long-term supplementation with CaCO3 on indices of Fe, Zn and Mg status was investigated in a randomized, double-blind intervention study of sixty lactating Gambian women. The supplement contained 1000 mg Ca and was consumed between meals 5 d/week, for 1 year starting 1.5 weeks postpartum. Compliance was 100%. Plasma ferritin concentration, plasma Zn concentration and urinary Mg output were measured before, during and after supplementation at 1.5, 13, 52 and 78 weeks postpartum. No significant differences in mineral status were observed at any time between women in the supplement and placebo group. Analysis of the longitudinal data series showed that plasma ferritin and Mg excretion were characteristic of the indivdiual (P < 0·001). Within individuals, ferritin concentration was higher at 1.5 weeks postpartum than later in lactation (P = 0.002). Plasma Zn concentration was lower at 1.5 weeks postpartum than at other tima (P < 0·001), an effect which disappeared after albumin correction. Low plasma concentrations of ferritin and Zn indicated that the Gambian women were at high risk of Fe and Zn deficiency. Measurements of α1-antichymotrypsin suggested that the results were not confounded by acute-phase responses. The results of the present study indicate that 1000 mg Ca as CaCO3 given between meals does not deleteriously affect plasma ferritin and Zn concentrations or urinary Mg excretion in women who are at risk of Fe and Zn deficiency

Type
Human and Clinical Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1997

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