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Don't disregard the essential distinction between PUFA species

  • Christopher E. Ramsden (a1), Joseph R. Hibbeln (a1), Sharon F. Majchrzak-Hong (a1) and John M. Davis (a2)
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References

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11 Ramsden, CE, Hibbeln, JR & Majchrzak, SF (2011) All PUFAs are not created equal: absence of CHD benefit specific to linoleic acid in randomized controlled trials and prospective observational cohorts. World Rev Nutr Diet (In the Press).
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19 Ramsden, CE, Hibbeln, JR & Lands, WE (2008) Letter to the Editor re: Linoleic acid and coronary heart disease. Prostaglandins Leukot. Essent. Fatty Acids, (2008), by W.S. Harris. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 80, 77.
20 Ramsden, C (2009) A misrepresented meta-analysis. Letter to Circulation. http://www.americanheart.org/downloadable/heart/1256648338750Omega6letterswresp.pdf (accessed March 2011).
21 US Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service (2010) Nutrient Intakes from Food: Mean Amounts Consumed per Individual, by Gender and Age, What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2007–2008). http://www.ars.usda.gov/ba/bhnrc/fsrg (accessed March 2011).
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26 Kuipers, RS, Luxwolda, MF, Dijck-Brouwer, DA, et al. (2010) Estimated macronutrient and fatty acid intakes from an East African Paleolithic diet. Br J Nutr 104, 16661687.
27 Blasbalg, T, Hibbeln, JR, Ramsden, CE, et al. (2011) Changes in omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid consumption in the US during the 20th century. Am J Clin Nut (epublication ahead of print version 2 March 2011).
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30 Hu, FB, Stampfer, MJ, Manson, JE, et al. (1999) Dietary intake of α-linolenic acid and risk of fatal ischemic heart disease among women. Am J Clin Nutr 69, 890897.

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